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ALMANAC 


FOB 

ilMotntctl Church in tke it. 


FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 



What is thy only comfort in life and in death? 


ANSWER. 

That I, with body and soul, both in life and in death, am not my own, but belong to my faithful Saviour Jesus 
Christ, who, with His precious blood, hath fully satisfied for all my sins, and redeemed me from all the power 
of the Devil; and so preserves me, that, without the will of my Father in Heaven, not a hair can fall from my 
head j yea, that all things must work together for my salvation. Wherefore, by His Holy Spirit, He also assures 
me of eternal life, and makes me heartily willing and ready henceforth to live unto Him. ♦ 


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S. R. FISHER & CO, 

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r.rf Tr a ] 

?5I HTSfOtS td A . 











































































































REFORMED CHURCH ALMANAC FOR 1868. 


Moon’s Signs. 

Signs of the Zodiac. 

Planets and Aspects. 

Moon 

First 

Quarter 

Jpk Full 
Moon. 
Last 
Quarter. 

Ram. 

Bull. 

Twins. 

HIS Cancer. 

f#Lion. 

^ Virgin. 

£&$ Balance, 
mg Scorpion. 

<(&? Bowman. 
•a^Goat. 

Waterman. 

^Fishes. 

1^ Saturn. 

If J upiter. 

£ Mars. 

©Sun. 

2 Venus. 

$ Mercury. 

1 > Moon. 

W Herschel. 


6 Conjunction, or planets in the same longitude. □ Quartile, when they are 90 degrees distant. 
©Sextile, when they are 60 degrees apart. ATrine, when they are 120 degrees distant. 

<? Opposition, when they are 180 degrees distant. 


The Latin Names of the Signs of the Zodiac are: 

Aries (Ram), Taurus (Bull), Gemini (Twins), Cau:er (Crab), Leo (Lion), Virgo (Virgin), Libra 
(Balance), Scorpio (Scorpion), Sagittarius (Bowman), Capricornus (Goat), Aquarius (Waterman), 
Pisces (Fishes). 

Chronological Cycles. 

Dominical Letter,E. D.—Golden Number, 7.—Epact, 6.—Solar Cycle, i.—Roman Indiction, 11.— 
Julian Period, 6581. 

The four Cardinal Points. 

Vernal Equinox, entrance of the Sun into Aries, March 20, at 2 o’clock 45 min. in the morning. 
Summer Solstice, entrance of the Sun into Cancer, June 20, at 11 o’clock 12 min. in the evening. 
Autumnal Equinox, entrance of the Sun into Libra, Sept. 22, at 1 o’clock 34 min. in the afternoon. 
Winter Solstice, entrance of the Sun into Capricornus, Dec. 21, at 7 o’clock 30 min. in the morn : ng. 

Ember Days. 

March 13, June 12, September 18, December 19. 


Movable Festivals of the Ciiurcti. 


Septuagesima Sunday, Feb. 9. 
Quinquagesima Sunday, “ 23. 

Shrove Tuesday, “ 25. 

Ash Wednesday, “ 26. 


Palm Sunday, April 5. 
Good Friday, April 10. 
Easter Sunday, April 12. 
Ascension Day, May 21. 


V T hit Sunday, (Pentecost) May 31. 
Trinity Sunday, June 7. 

First Sunday in Advent, Nov. 29. 
Sundays after Trinity are 24. 


The Jewish Era in 1868 commences Sept. 17., with 5629, and the Mohammedan, April 24, with 1285. 

Eclipses in the year 1868. 

There will be two Eclipses this year, both of the Sun, viz: 

The first is an annular Eclipse of the Sun, February 23d, 9 o’clock 20 minutes in the morning, in¬ 
visible in the United States; visible in South America, the Atlantic Ocean and Africa. The central 
line of this Eclipse begins in Longitude 9° 22' West of Philadelphia, and Latitude 11° 26' South, 
and ends in Longitude 90° 38' East of Philadelphia, and Latitude 19° 26' North. 

The second is a total Eclipse of the Sun, August 18th, 12 o’clock 15 minutes in the morning, in¬ 
visible here; visible in Asia, the Indian Ocean, and Australia. 


- 

Year. 

Good Friday, 

Easter, 

Ascension Day, 

Whit Sunday, 

Tr. Sundays, 

First Advent, 

Christinas, 

Table 

1869 

March 26. 

March 28. 

May 6. 

May 16. 

26 

Nov. 28. 

Saturday. 


1870 

April 15. 

April 17. 

May 26. 

June *. 

23 

Nov. 27. 

Sunday. 

of 

■ 1871 

April 7. 

April 9. 

May 18. 

May 28. 

25 

Dec. 3. 

Monday. 


1872 

March 29. 

March 31. 

May 9. 

May 19. 

26 

Dec. 1. 

Wednesday. 

Festivals. 

1873 

April 11. 

April 13. 

May 22. 

June 1. 

24 

Nov. 30. 

Thursday/ 


1874 

April 3. 

April 5. 

Mav 14. 

May 24. 

25 

Nov. 29. 

Friday. 


The calculations of this Almanac a,re made to solar time, by Lawrence J. Ibach, (successor to 
Charles F. Egelman,) Sheridan P. O., Pa. 

































JANUARY, 1st Month, 31 Days. __ 1868. 


Weeks and 
Days. 

Remarkable days. 

Daily Bible 
Lessons. 

Moon 

R.&S. 
h m 

Moon’s 

Place. 

Miscellaneous Particu¬ 
lars. 

s 

si. 

m 

SUN 
rises 
h m 

SUN 

sets, 
h m 

O 

00 

o* 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

1 

2 

3 

4 

New Year. 
Abel, Seth 
Enoch 

Isabella 

Gal. 3, 23-29 
Gen. 4, 2-8 
“ 5, 18-24 

1 Kings 21 

11 29 
morn. 

12 18 
1 10 

## 5 
18 
2 

go?16 

8 W O ? se. 6 26 

6.%Q Dapo. 
y. sets 9 25 
^ rises 3 50 

4 

4 

5 
5 

7 23 
7 23 
7 23 
7 23 

4 37 
4 37 
4 37 
4 37 

20 

21 

22 

23 


1] Sunday after New Year. Gosp. Matth. 2,13-23. Ep. 1 Pet. 4,12-19. Days length 9 hours 16 min 


Sunday 

5 

Simon 

Luke 

2, 25-32 

2 15 

go? 29 

Sirius south 11 32 

5 

7 22 

4 38 

24 

Monday 

6 

Epiphany 

Matth. 2, 1-12 

3 20 

M 14 

9 greatest Hel. 1. so. 

6 

7 22 

4 38 

25 

Tuesday 

7 

Isidor 

u 

42 

4 30 

II 29 

9 sets 6 39 ^ 

6 

7 21 

4 39 

26 

Wednesday 

8 

Erhard 

u 

3, 1-12 

5 42 

&#e 14 

Orion south 10 30 

7 

7 21 

4 39 

27 

Thursday 

9 

Julian 

u 

5, 27 f. 

rises. 

*§5 29 

9th. D in per. 

7 

7 20 

4 40 

28 

Friday 

10 

Paul's imp 

u 

10 

5 50 

14 

y. sets 9 11 

8 

7 19 

4 41 

29 

Saturday 

11 

Hyginius 

u 

12 

7 1 

28 

b rises 3 6 

8 

7 19 

4'41 

30 


2] 1st Sunday after Epip. Gosp. Luke 2,41-52. Ep. Rom. 12, 1-6. Day 1 s length 9 hours 24 min. 


Sunday 

12 

Rinehold 

Matth. 13,1-22 

8 

6 

&= 12 

7 >{< south 8 9 

8 

7 

18 

4 42 

31 

Monday 

13 

Hilary 

“ 3,13-17 

9 

10 

f* 25 

£2 Rigel so. 9 30 

9 

7 

17 

4 43 

J. 

Tuesday 

14 

Felix 

Acts 24 

10 

11 

sh 8 

Aldeb. south 8 41 

9 

7 

17 

4 43 

2 

Wednesday 

15 

Maurice 

Matth. 15 

11 

12 

20 

Arctur. rises 118 

10 

7 

16 

4 44 

3 

Thursday 

16 

Marcellus 

“ 16 

morn. 

* 2 

16. lj.se 8 56 

10 

7 

15 

4 45 

4 

Friday 

17 

Anthony 

Acts 9, 23 f. 

12 

8 

* i4 

6 $ % 9 se. 7 1 

10 

7 

15 

4 45 

5 

Saturday 

18 

Franklin born 

Prov. 3 

1 

12 

*26 

Capella south 9 4 

11 

7 

14 

4 46 

6 


3] 2nd Sunday after Epip. Gosp. John 2,1-11. Ep. Rom. 12, 7—16. Day's length 9 hours 34 min. 


Sunday 

19 

Sarah 

1 Peter 3, 1-7 

2 20 

8 

6 D k rises 2 40 

11 

7 

13 

4 47 

7 

Monday 

20 

F. Sebastian 

Mark 10 

3 28 

#• 20 

O enters 

11 

7 

12 

4 48 

8 

Tuesday 

21 

Agnes 

u jo 

4 36 

3 

1J sets 8 43 ^ 

12 

7 

11 

4 49 

9 

Wednesday 

22 

Vincent 

“ 13 

5 25 

16 

9 sets 7 14 

12 

7 

10 

4 50 

10 

Thursday 

23 

Emerenth 

Matth. 5 

6 20 

^28 

Din apo. % $ O sup. 

12 

7 

9 

4 51 

11 

Friday 

24 

Timothy 

1 Tim. 1 

sets. 

A 11 

24th. d 6 % $ 

12 

7 

8 

4 52 

12 

Saturday 

25 

Paul's Conv. 

Acts 9, 1-22 

6 24 

A 24 

i vgjgy Spi. ris. 1121 

13 

7 

7 

4 53 

13 


4] 3 rd Sunday after Epip Gosp Mat th. 8,1-13. Ep. Rom. 12, 17-21. Day's length 9 hours 48 min. 


Sunday 

26 

Polycarpus [ 

Matth. 6 

7 27 

<&< * 

y 9 sets 7 30 

13 

7 

6 

4 54 

14 

Monday 

27 

F. Chrysost 

“ 7 

8 31 

3S 20 

D 9 1J gr. Hel. 1. so. 

13 

7 

5 

4 55 

15 

Tuesday 

28 

Charles 

“ 14 

9 35 

iff# 3 

^ sets 8 32 

13 

7 

4 

4 56 

16 

Wednesday 

29 

Valerius 

Rom. 6 

10 39 

IS# 16 

1? rises 2 1 

13 

7 

3 

4 57 

17 

Thursday 

30 

Adelgunda 

Luke 9 

11 43 

iff# 20 

691 / Sir. so. 9 50 

13 

7 

2 

4 58 

18 

Friday 

31 

Virgil 

« 12 

morn 

13 

Orion south 8 50 

14 

7 

1 

4 59 

19 


Mars ( % ) is on the 2d in Conjunction with the Sun, and cannot be seen. 


MOON’S PHASES. 


-^-——- 

HISTORICAL REMINISCENCES.— January. 


First Quarter, 2d day, 10 o’clock 58 min. Evening. 

Full Moon, 9th “ 6 “ 45 “ Evening. 

Last Quarter, 16th “ 11 “ 58 “ Forenoon. 

New Moon, 24th “ 2 u Q “ Afternoon. 


Titus, a companion of the Apostle Paul (Gal. ii. 3), 
died the 4th, in the year 94. 

Paul, a noted hermit in Egypt, died the 10th, 341. 
Polycarp, the aged and venerable Bishop of Smyrna,, 
died as a martyr, the 26th, 169. 



























































































JANUARY. 



THE PALLING SNOW. 


What a beautiful sight is the falling snow. The 
picture gives us a snow-scene. The farmers are 
driving their cattle into the stable; and one stands 
ready to welcome them to a rack of hay, which he 
has just filled with the fork. Seeing the snow fall 
reminds one of the words of the Psalmist: “He 
giveth snow like wool.” 

THE HEW TEAR. 

How time flies! Here we are at the beginning of 
1868. We enter upon a new section of our journey. 
We have again fifty-two weeks, twelve months, and 
365 days before us. What an amount of good or of 
evil we may do this year! Let us begin, continue, 
and end all our doings this year in Christ. Then 
when it is passed, we shall look back upon it with 
joy and not with sorrow. 

TAKE THE CHURCH PAPERS. 

Those who do not take the church papers stand in 
their own light. As the old saying has it, they save 
at the spiggot and lose at the bunghole. For a few 
dollars they can procure good Christian reading for 
their families during a whole year. The children 
will learn, and improve more than ten times the cost 
of the papers. If you must be economical, save the 
amount some other way. But what shall we say of 
those who take a secular paper, and do not take their 
church-paper. We will only say—shame! 


COLD! COLD! 

January is a month when the pastor needs wood. 
Suppose you look at his w r ood-p le as you pass* and 
if it is low, haul him a load. You need not cut it 
for him; the Almanac man thinks he ought to do 
that himself, to keep his blood in healthy circulation. 
Hut it must be hauled to his pile first, before he can 
cut ir. 


WITHOUT THE CHILDREN. 


BY J. H. M’NAUGHTON. 


0 the weary solemn silence 
Of a house without the children; 

0 the strange, oppressive stillness 
Where the children come no more! 
Ah ! the longing of the sleepless 
For the soft arms of the children, 

Ah ! the longing for the faces 

Peeping through the opening door— 
Faces gone for evermore ! 

Strange it is, to wake at midnight 
And not hear the children breathing, 
Nothing but the old clock ticking, 
Ticking, ticking by the door. 

Strange to see the little dresses 
Hanging up there all the morning; 

And the gaiters—ah ! their patter, 

We will never hear it more 
On our mirth-forsaken floor! 

What is home without the children ? 
'Tis the earth without the verdure, 

And the sky without the sunshine; 

Life is withered to the core ! 

So we’ll leave this dreary desert, 

And we’ll follow the Good Shepherd 
To the greener pastures vernal, 

Where the lambs have “ gone before " 
With the Shepherd evermore! 

0 the weary, solemn silence, 

Of a house without the children ; 

0 the strange, oppressive stillness 
Where the children come no more! 
Ah! the longing of the sleepless 
For the soft arms of the children; 

Ah ! the longing for the faces 

Peeping through the opening door—* 
Faces gone for evermore. 















FEBRUARY, 2nd Month, 29 Days. 1868. 


Weeks and 
days. 

Remarkable days. 

Daily Bible 
Lessons. 

^Moon's 

^ &S 'j Place, 
h m 1 

Miscellaneous Particu¬ 
lars. 

S.) SUN 
si. rises 
mj h m 

SUN 

sets, 
h in 

j[0. Style: 

Saturday 

1| Bridget 

Rom. 2 

12 S0| £2? 27||;2 1st. $ se. 7 36 ^ 

14j7 0, 

5 0)20 


5] 4th Sunday after Epip. Gosp. Matth. 8, 23-27. Ep. Rom. 13, 8-10. Days length 10 hours 2 min 


Sunday 

2 1 Gandlemass 

Luke 2, 22-32 

1 56 

9 

7>k south 6 44 

14 

6 59 

5 

1 

21 

Monday 

3 

Blasius 

Rom. 3 

2 58 

M 21 

Sirius south 9 31 

14 

6 58 

5 

2 

22 

Tuesday 

4 

Veronica 

“ 4 

3 46 

4s 3 

h rises 1 59 F* 

14 

6 57 

5 

3 

23 

Wednesday 

5 

Spener 

Matth. 18,31 f. 

4 34 

HS 16 

6 j) # % sets 8 0 

14 

6 56 

5 

4 

24 

Thursday 

6 

Dorothy 

1 Cor. 14 

5 22 

ms 24 

Spica rises 10 32 

14 

6 55 

5 

*5 

25 

Friday 

7 

Richard 

2 Cor. 1 

6 10 

i# 13 

Orion so. 8 26 

14 

6 54 

5 

6 

26 

Saturday 

8 

Solomon 

“ 2 

rises 

27 

8. 9 se. 7 50 & 

14 

6 53 

5 

7 

27 


6] Septuagesima. Matth. 20, 1—16. Ep. 1 Cor. 9, 24—10, 5. Day's length 10 hours 16 min. 


Sunday 

9 

Apollonia 

2 Oor. 

3 

7 41 

&= 9 

Arctur rises 9 32 

15 

6 52 

5 

8 

28 

Monday 

10 

Scholastica 

U 

4 

8 29 

&,•= 22 

Antares rises 3 21 

15 

6 51 

5 

9 

29 

Tuesday 

11 

Euphrosina 

u 

5 

9 19 

sh 5 

Regulus so. 12 18 

15 

6 49 

5 

11 

30 

Wednesday 

12 

Eulalia 

u 

6 

9 51 

sh H 

11 sets 7 30 

15 

6 48 

5 

12 

31 

Thursday 

13 

Castor 

u 

7 

10 48 

Sh 29 

Androm. sets 10 1 

15 

6 47 

5 

13 

F. 

Friday 

14 

Valentine 

a 

8 

11 44 


9 sets 8 2 

15 

6 45 

5 

15 

2 

Saturday 

15 

Faustinus 

u 

9 

morn. 

tJH 24 

15. k ri. 12 48 

14 

6 44 

5 

16 

3 

7] Sexagesima. Gosp. Luke 8, 4- 

-15. Ep. 2 Cor. 11,19 

' —12, 9. Day's length 10 hours 34 min. 

Sunday 

16 

Melanchton 

2 Cor. 10 

12 40 

6 

Sirius south 8 0 

14 

6 43 

5 

17 

4 

Monday 

17 

Constantia 

(i 

11, 1-18 

1 33 

#• 18 

6 5 % % sets 6 55 

14 

6 42 

5 18 

5 

Tuesday 

18 

Concordia 

U 

12, 10 f. 

2 26 

o 

Proc. so. 9 24 ^ 

14 

6 41 

5 

19 

6 

Wednesday 

19 

Susanna 

Gal. 1 


3 14 

*&12 

© ent. Jg; D apo. 

14 

6 39 

5 

21 

7 

Thursday 

20 

Eucharius 

1 Kings 3 

4 2 

^25 

9 sets 8 15 

14 

6 38 

5 

22 

8 

Friday 

21 

Elenora 

Gal. 6 


4 45 


9 greatest dist. east 

14 

6 37 

5 

23 

9 

Saturday 

22 

Wash. Birth. 

Prov. 10 

5 40 

J| 21 

6 3) £ £ rises 5 49 

14 

6 35 

5 

25 

10 


8] Quinquagesima. Gosp. Luke 18, 31-43. Ep. 1 Cor. 13. Days length 10 hours 52 nun. 


Sunday 

23 

Serenus 

Matth. 13,1-23 

sets. 

A 

JUl 23. % s. 6 30 13 

14 

6 34 

5 

26 

11 

Monday 

24 

Matthew 

“ # 11, 25 f 

6 40 

3K 17 

D % $ □ hO 

14 

6 33 

5 27 

12 

Tuesday 

25 

Shrove Tries. 

Joel 2 

7 46 

£ 29 

$ sets 6 42 

13 

6 31 

5 

29 

13 

Wednesday 

26 

Ash Wedn'sd'y. 

Job 42 

8 47 


<5)9 9 sets 8 26 

13 

6 30 

5 

30 

14 

Thursday 

27 

Leander 

1 Thess. 1 

9 50 

f#2 7 

5 stationary 

13 

6 29 

5 

31 

15 

Friday 

28 

Romanus 

“ 2 

10 54 

£5? .13 

h rises 12. 2 

13 

6 28 

5 

32 

16 

Saturday 

29 

lntercal. day 

“ 3 

11 57 

£G? 27 

£ rises 7 30 

13 

6 26 

5 

34 

17 


Venus (9) is Evening Star until the 16th of July, 12 o’clock 24 minutes in the afternoon, then 
again Morning Star until the end of the year. 


MOON’S PHASES. 

First Quarter, 1st day, 1 o’clock 1 min Afternoon. 

Full Moon, 8th “ 4 “ 21 “ Morning. 

Last Quarter, 15th “4 “2 “ Morning. 

New Moon, 23d “9 “6 “ Morning, 


HISTORICAL REMINISCENCES.— Feejvuary. 

Ignatius, many years Bishop in Alexandria, was cast 
before lions, and died as a martyr on the 1st, 107. 

Hannah More, a celebrated female writer in Eng¬ 
land, was born the 2d, 1745. 

Melanchton born the 16th, 1197. 




















































































FEBRUARY. 



MISSIONARIES TO THE HEATHEN. 


Some persons do not wish to contribute money to 
send the Gospel to the heathen. They say money 
is not necessary. Suppose some missionaries sail in 
those ships; the first thing is to pay the men, who 
own the ships, for taking them over. Then when 
they arrive on heathen shores they must be supported 
by us till there are Christian congregations estab¬ 
lished. This, and many other things, require money. 
Those narrow, stingy souls, who think that is not their 
duty to give for the spread of Christ’s kingdom, are 
to be pitied as much as the poor heathen themselves. 

ALMSGIVING. 

Your money given to Missions, to Beneficiary Edu¬ 
cation, to the Orphan Home, or to any other similar 
object, is called alms. 

Your alms are not given to men, but to God. 
Christ himself says: “Inasmuch as ye have done it 
unto one of the least of these , my brethren, ye have 
done it unto ME.” 

Your almsgiving is an act of worship, just as really 
so as singing or praying or fasting. Do you doubt 
it? Here are several proofs: 

1. Deut. xvi. 16, 17; where God connects the 
thank-offerings of the Jews with their worship. 

2. The Lord’s treasury was in the temple at Jeru¬ 
salem (See Mark xii. 41). 

3. Christ places prayer, fasting and thanksgiving 
side by side as acts of worship (Mat. vi. 1-18). 

4. The prayers and alms of Cornelius were a me¬ 
morial before God. (Acts x. 4). 

5. In 1 Cor. xvi. 2, Paul positively requires alms¬ 
giving every Lord’s Day, in connection with the other 
service and worship. 


Both in the Old Testament and in the New, alms¬ 
giving is an act of worship. Ought you then to call 
it “ money-begging?” If God appointed it in the 
beginning, and if Christ and the Apostles urged its 
practice, should you then think of it as a trick of 
Synod or a device of the ministry to drain the poc¬ 
kets of the people? 

As an act of worship your almsgiving must be:— 

1. Sincere , not to be seen of men, but from true 
love to Christ and His cause; from true gratitude to 
God for His goodness. Skicere, as any other act of 
worship must be, to be acceptable. 

2. Freewill; not forced; not from self-respect; but 
because the heart says, a Give.” There must be a 
u willing mind.” See 2 Cor. viii. 12; ix. 7; also Ex. 
xxxv. 5, 21, 22, 26, 29! Cheerful givers ! 

3. According to your ability ; uot as little, but as 
much as possible. So did the widow (Mark xii. 41). 
The Macedonian Christians did even more than they 
were able (2 Cor. viii. 3). See how much you spend 
for extra dress, for tobacco, drinks, and other luxu¬ 
ries; why can you not give some-of this to the Lord, 
in addition to what you do give? Crucify the flesh, 
with its affections and lusts, and so offer to the Lord 
real “ sacrifices” of thanksgiving. Why not let it 
be said of us, as it was said of the Jews, Ex. xxxvi. 
5-7? We are building a greater and more glorious 
tabernacle than that—Christ’s Church. Oh, let our 
zeal and liberality also be greater! 

See also what blessed promises God gives in regard 
to liberal almsgiving: Prov. xi. 24, 25; iii. 9; Mai. 
iii. 10-12: Luke vi. 38; 2 Cor. iii. 6. 

Do you believe these promises ? Then show your 
faith by liberal giving. 


YOU SURELY GET THE WORST OP IT? 

You surely get the worst of it, if you call your 
pa3tor a beggar , when he calls on you for money for 
missions, for the orphans, or for any other benevolent 
cause; since, if he must beg, it is because you are 
not willing to give to the Lord. Do you not see 
that you are casting a reproach, not upon him, but 
upon yourself, when you call him by so ugly a name? 

He is not a beggar, but the servant of Christ. 
You are a steward, or householder, and Christ sends 
the pastor to gather your alms, your dues to the 
Lord. If he must beg them from you, it only shows 
there is something wrong with your heart. 

Never call him a beggar. You always get the 
worst of the name. 


7 









MARCH) Srd Month, 31 Days. 1868# 


Weeks and 
Bays. 

Remarkable days. 

Daily Bible 
Lessons. 

Moon 

R.&S. 

h m 

Moon's 
Place. 

Miscellaneous Par¬ 
ticulars. 

s, 

si. 

m 

SUN 
rises 
h m 

SUN 

sets. 

h in 

O 

tT 

9] ls£ Sunday in Lent. Gosp. Matth. 4,1— 

11. Ep. 2 Cor. 6 , 1 — 10 . Day's length 11 hours 10 min. 

Sunday 

1 

Albinus 

Dan 3 

morn. 

M 12 

1 . gr. H.L n.^> 

13 

6 25 

5 35 

18 

Monday 

2 

Simplicius 

Job 1 

1 1 

W 26 

gr.H.l.n.R 

12 

6 24 

5 36 

19 

Tuesday 

3 

Samuel 

1 Sam. 4 

2 3 

HE 12 

<5 9 sets 8 40 

12 

6 23 

5 37 

20 

Wednesday 

4 

Emberday 

1 Sam. 5 

3 0 

HE 24 

h rises 11 50 

12 

6 21 

5 39 

21 

Thursday 

5 

Frederick 

2 Thess. 2 

3 52 

6 

6 % y Sirius so. 7 33 

12 

6 20 

5 40 

22 

Friday 

6 

Fridolin 

2 Thess. 3 

4 40 

20 

D per. Reg. so. 10 53 

11 

6 18 

5 42 

23 

Saturday 

7 

Perpetua 

l Tim. 2 

5 31 

8 - 3j 

% rises 5 22 

11 

6 17 

5 43,24 


10] 2nd Sunday in Lent, Gosp. Matth. 15, 21—-28. Ep. 1 Thess. 4, 1 —7. Day’s length 11 h. 28 min. 


Sunday 

8 

Philemon 

Philemon 

rises. 

Sr 16 

MOM. 6 » G inf. SI 

11 

6 

16 

5 44 

25 

Monday 

9 

Prudence 

i Tim. 3 

6 52 

|;= 29 

9 sets 8 58 

11 

6 

15 

5 45 

26 

Tuesday 

10 

Appolonius 

l Tim. 4 

7 50 

A -12 

6 y Q 7* ris. 11 48 

10 

8 13 

5 47 

27 

Wednesday 

11 

Rosina 

“ 5 

8 48 

A 24 

Rigel sets 11 12 

10 

6 

12 

5 48 

28 

Thursday 

12 

Gregory 

“ 6 

9 40 

* 6 

b , rises 11 10 

10 

6 

10 

5 50 

29 

Friday 

13 

Macedon 

Gal. 2 

10 38 

ME is 

$ rises 5 12 

10 

6 

9 

5 51 

M 

Saturday 

14 

Zachariah 

Luke lj 5-25 

11 32 

^29 

6 3 ) h h stationary 

9 

6 

8 

5 52 

2 


11] Srd Sunday in Lent. Gosp. Luke 11, 14-28. Ep. Eph. 5, 1-9. Day’s length llnouts ±8 min. 


Sunday 

15 

Christopher 

2 Tim. 1 

morn. 

#r 12 

15. $ sets 9 12 

9 

6 

6 

5 

54 

3 

Monday 

16 

Cyprianus 

“ 2 

12 20 

24 

# stat. 8 g 9 

9 

6 

5 

5 

55 

4 

Tuesday 

17 

Gertrude 

Psalm 23 

1 12 

& 

Orion sets 12 24 w 

8 

6 

3 

5 

57 

5 

Wednesday 

18 

Anselm 

Titus 1 

2 2 


3 )apo. Reg. so. 10 8 

8 

6 

2 

5 

58 

6 

Thursday 

19 

Josephus 

“ 2 , 1-10 

2 48 

^29 

h rises 10 46 

8 

6 

1 

5 

59 

7 

Friday 

20 

Matrona 

“ 3 

3 33 

d, 12 

©in $ 3 ^ A Ai ght eq. 

8 

6 

0 

6 

0 

8 

Saturday 

21 

Benedictus 

1 John 1 

4 12 

d 25 

Spring Commence 

7 

5 

58 

6 

2 

9 


12] 4 th Sunday in Lent. Gosp. John 6 , 1-15. Ep. Gal. 4 ; 21-31. Day’s length 12 hours § min 


Sunday 

22 

Paulina 

2 Pet. 1 

4 49 

9, 8 

g S S rises 5 0 

7 

|5 57i6 

3 

10 

Monday 

23 

Eberhard 

“ 2 

5 28 

5 S 22 

3> v ?s 

7 

5 56 

6 

4 

11 

Tuesday 

24 

Gabriel 

Luke 1, 1-25 

sets 

## 6 

Vj£$2A Sp. ri. 7 38 

6 

5 54 

6 

6 

12 

Wednesday 

25 

Ann. V. M. 

“ 1 , 26-28 

7 48 

##21 

h rises* 10 22 

6 

v 5 53 

6 

7 

13 

Thursday 

26 

Emmanuel 

Isa. 8 

8 50 

pG? 5 

i in Perihel on 

6 

5 52 

6 

8 

14 

Friday 

27 

Gustavus 

1 John 2 

9 59 

pG? 20 

6 D 9 9 sets 9 38 

5 

5 50 

6 

10 

15 

Saturday 

28 

Malchus 

John 18 

11 12 

M 5 

7* sets 10 40 

5 

5 49 

6 

11 

16 


13] 5 th Sunday in Lent. John 8 , 46—59. Ep. Heb. 9, 11—15. Day’s length 12 hours 24 min. 


Sunday 

29 

Eustatius 

Heb. 7 

morn. 1 ^ 19 

!Q ¥ G Ori. s 11 40 

5 

5 48 

6 12 

17 

Monday 

30 

Guido 

Psalm 6 

12 16 HE 3 

j^i^v Sir. se. 11 5 pi 

4 

6 47 

6 13 

18 

Tuesday 

31 

Detlaus 

Matth. 26 

i ioj*se i7 

Ivjj/ 31. % ris. 4 46 

4 

5 45 

6 15 

19 


y Jupiter is on the 10th in Conjunction with the Sun and cannot be seen during this month. 


MOJN’S PHASES, 


HISTORICAL REMINISCENCES.— March. 


First Quarter, 1st day, 

11 o’clock 35 min. Evening. 

Full Moon, 8th 

a 

8 “ 

n 

<< 

Afternoon. 

Last Quarter, 16th 

a 

10 “ 

19 

a 

Forenoon. 

New* Moon, 24th 

(( 

1 “ 

55 

<{ 

Morning. 

First Quarter* 81st 

t( 

7 “ 

n 

<< 

Mprning. 


Fridolin, a celebrated missionary among the ancient 
Germans, died the 6th, 514, 

St. Patrick, the great Irish missionary, born the 
17th, 493. 

Constantine, the first Christian Emperor, died the 
22 * 14 * 337 : 








































































































MARCH. 



THE LITTLE CHILD’S PEAYEB. 


In the quiet nursery chambers, 

Snowy pillows yet unpressed, . 

See the forms of little children, 

Kneeling white-robed, for their rest. 

All in quiet nursery chambers, 

While the dusky shadows creep, 

Hear the voices of the children, * 

•‘Now I lay me down to sleep/' 

In the meadow and the mountain 
Calmly shine the winter stars, 

But across the glistening lowlands 
Slant the moonlight's silver bars. 

In the silence and the darkness, 

Darkness growing still more deep, 
Listen to the little children 

Praying God, their souls to keep. 

“If we die/'—so pray the children, 

And the mother’s head drops low, 

(One from out her fold is sleeping 
Deep beneath this winter’s snow,) 

“ Take our soulsand past the casement 
Flits a gleam of crystal light, 

Like the trailing of his garments 
Walking evermore in white. 

Little souls, that stand expectant 
Listening at the gates of life, 

Hearing, far away, the murmur 
Of the tumult and the strife; 

We, who fought beneath the banners, 
Meeting ranks of foemen there, 

Find a deeper, broader meaning, 

In your simple vesper prayer. 

When your hand shall grasp this standard 
Which, to-day, you watch from far 
When your deeds shall shape the conflict, 
In this universal war, 


Pray to Him, the God of battles, 

Whose strong eye can never sleep, 

In the warring of temptation, 

Firm and true our souls to keep. 

When the combat ends, and slowly 
Clears the smoke from out the skies, 

When, far down the purple distance, 

All the noise and battle dies; 

When the last night's solemn shadows, 

Settle down on you and me, 

May the love that never faileth, 

Take our souls eternally. 

THE OEPHAFS HOME, 

The Oi*phan ? s Home at Bridesburg has been in 
successful operation since its commencement. In 1867 
about $16,000 were expended. Some of this, how¬ 
ever, was applied to payment of property. The 
number of orphans is about one hundred. It has 
been found that the interests of the institution re¬ 
quire a change of location. Accordingly a beautiful 
location, with buildings all complete, has been pur¬ 
chased. It is the “ South Mountain Springs," near 
Womelsdorf, in Berks Co. This costs $33,000. 
About $10,000 is realized from the old Home, 
leaving $23,000 more to make up. The Home in¬ 
cludes 27 acres of land. The building can accom¬ 
modate about 200 children. The place is beautiful, 
convenient, and in all respects well* adapted to its 
purpose. The home was removed to its new location 
in October. Superintendent, Rev. D. Y. Heisler; 
Superintending Matron, Mrs. Leah R. Heisler. The 
Home has besides two excellent teachers. The chil¬ 
dren are taught German and English. The orphans 
are given wholly into the care of the Home; the boys 
till they are 20, and the girls till they are 18 years 
of age. The Board of Managers make it a point to 
place as many orphans as possible into Christian fa¬ 
milies. By this means they enjoy the advantages of 
family training in Christian homes, and thus also a 
larger number of orphans can be provided for with 
less expense. 

Let all our people remember the poor orphans 
with frequent gifts of love, and teach their children 
to contribute to this good object. Christ says, what 
we do to His poor, we do to Him. 

FAULTS. 

You find a good many faults in your pastor. Won¬ 
der how many faults he could find in you, if he were 
to try ? It is a poor rule that does not work both wqv? 

9 







1868. 


APRIL, 4 th Month, 30 Days. 


Weeks and 
Days. 

Remarkable days. 

Daily Bible | 
Lessons. j 

Moon 

R.&S. 

h m 

Moon’s 

Place. 

{Miscellaneous Particu¬ 
lars. 

s. 

si. 

m 

SUN 
rises 
h m 

SUN 

sets, 
h m 

C 

OD 

*<t 

o' 

Wednesday 

1 [Theodore 

Psalm 12 

2 2 

29 

9 sets 9 50 ps 

4 

5 44 

6 16 

20 

Thursday 

2.Theodosia 

“ 16 

2 50 

13 

h rises 9 52 

4 

5 43 

6 17 

21 

Friday 

3iFerdinand 

“ 18 

3 32 

rP 26 

D in per. $ ris. 4 42 

3 

5 41 

6 19 

22 

Saturday 

4|Ambrosius 

Matth. 27 

4 10 

9 

9 greatest dist. west 

3 

5 40 

6 20|23 


14] Palm Sunday. Gosp. Matth. 21, 1—9. Ep. Phil.. 2, 5—11. Day’s length 12 hours 42 min 


Sunday 

5 

Maximus 

Matth. 28 

4 43 


22 

% rises 4 36 


3 

5 39 

6 

21 

24 

Monday 

6 

Egesippus 

Heb 1 

5 14 

A 

5 

A a Aid. s 10 

22 

2 

5 37 

6 

23 

25 

Tuesday 

7 

Aaron 

Exodus 4 

rises. 

A 17 

X&y 7th. 9 se. 10 

8 

2 

5 36 

4 

24 

26 

Wednesday 

8 

Dyonisius 

Acts 17 

7 44 

ms 

0 

•6 % % Ori. se. 11 

8 

2 

5 35 

6 

25 

27 

Thursday 

9 

Maundy Th. 

1 Cor. 11, 23 ff 

8 40 


12 

Regulus so. 8 47 


2 

5 33 

6 

27 

28 

Friday 

10 

Good Friday 

Isa. 53 

9 35 

ml 

24 

6 D b k rises 9 26 

1 

5 32 

6 28 

29 

Saturday 

11 

Julius 

Acts 27 

10 27 


6 

An tares ris. 10 37 


1 

5 31 

6 

29 

30 


15] Easter. Gosp. Mark 16, 1—8. Ep. 1 Cor. 5, 6—8. Day’s length 13 hours 0 min. 


Sunday 

12 

Easter Sund. 

Matth. 28,1-10 

11 

18 

18 

1 9 sets 10 18 


1 

5 

30 

6 30 

31 

Monday 

13 

Easter Mond . 

Luke 24,13-35 

morn. 

0 

6 0^ rises 4 28 ^ 

0 

5 

28 

6 32 

A. 

Tuesday 

14 

Tyburtius 

Luke 4, 36-47 

12 

8 

^12 

14. We. r. 

8 15 


5 

27 

6 33 

2 

Wednesday 

15 

Olympia 

Heb. 5 

12 

56 

24 

Spi. so. 11 

42 

N 

§e 

5 26j6 34 

3 

Thursday 

16. 

Calixtus 

“ 8 

1 

38 


7>|< sets 9 30 


"S 

5 

25 

6 35 

4 

Friday 

17 

Rudolph 

“ 9, 16 ff 

2 

18 

|| 18 

6 $ $ Rigel se. 

9 53 

1 

5 

24 

6 36 

5 

Saturday 

18 

Aeneas 

Acts 9, 23, ff 

2 55 

1 

h rises 8 53 


1 

5 

23 

6 37 

6 


16] lstf Sunday after Easter. Gosp. Jobn 20,19-31. Ep. 1 John 5,4-10. Day’s length 13 hrs. 18 min. 


Sunday 

19 

Anicetus 

Psalm 6 

3 27 

3S 14: 

?5 9 fets 10 30 • 

1 

5 21 

6 39 

7 

Monday • 

20 

Sulpitius 

Heb. 11 

4 2 

SK 28, 

l)(5^S?Sri4 19 

1 

5 20 

6 40 

8 

Tuesday 

21 

Adolarius 

Psalm 12 

4 39 

12 

.dfei © enters £*$ 

1 

5 19 

6 41 

9 

Wednesday 

22 

Cajus 

“ 16 

sets. 

ff# 27, 

'f||*22. % ri. 4 0 mo. 

2 

5 1816 42 

10 

Thursday 

23 

St. George 

“ 18 

7 40 

12 Sirius sets 9 36 

2 

5 17 6 43 

11 

Friday 

24 

Albert 

" 19 

8 56 

27.. $gr. Hel. lat. south 

2 

5 15 6 45| 

112 

Saturday 

25 

Mark Evan. 

1 Peter 5,12 ff 

10 8 

12 ; \i rises 8 25 

2 

5 14,6 46jl3 


17] 2 d Sunday aft. Easter. Gosp. John 10,12-16. Ep. 1 Pet. 2, 21-25. Day’s length 13 hrs. 34 min. 


Sunday 

26 

Cletus 

1 John 3, 1-12 

11 

13 

M 27 

6 J) 9 9 gr. H. 1 n. p* 

2 

5 

13 

6 47 

14 

Monday 

27 

Anastasius 

Heb. 12 

morn. 

n fe 11 

6 D # 9 sets 10 43 

3 

5 12 

6 48 

15 

•Tuesday 

28 

Vitalis 

Psalm 22 

12 

6 

*§S 25 

Dper. % ri.4 10 

3 

5 

10 

6 50 

16 

Wednesday 

29 

Sybilla 

“ 33 

12 

58 

9 

sjg/29. X ris. 3 39 

3 

5 

9 

6 51 

17 

Thursday 

30 

Eutropius 

“ 35 

1 

40 

HRP 23 

Antares rises 9 26 

3 

5 

8 

6 52 

18 


MOON’S PHASES. 

Full Moon, 7th day, 2 o’clock 14 min. Morning. 

Last Quarter, 14th “ 6 “ 33 “ Evening. 

New Moon, 22nd “ 3 “ 21 “ Afternoon. 

First Quarter, 29th “ 1 li 20 “ Afternoon. 


HISTORICAL REMINISCENCES.— April. 

Ambrose, Archbishop of Milan, died the 4th, 397. 
He was a distinguished writer and teacher, and ex¬ 
ercised great influence in the Church. 

Origen, also a distinguished writer and teacher in 
the ancient Church, died the 22nd, 254. 


























































































APRIL. 


M- 



PLAY, 


There is a proverb : “All work and no play, makes 
Jack a dull boy.” There is a great truth in this say¬ 
ing. Play seems a necessity, especially for children. 
But it must be remembered that as there are right, 
so there are also wrong kinds of play. Some plays 
tend to lead the young into folly, idleness, and sin. 
They lead to gambling, drinking, and the neglect of 
the grave duties of life. These ought to be shunned 
and discouraged. As children will, and perhaps 
must have play, it is wise for parents to provide for 
them the right kind of amusements. If they have 
not the right kind, they are tempted to seek the 
wrong. The boys in the picture are playing cricket 
ball. This is one of the many out-door healthful 
kinds of ball-playing. It is mentioned as early as 
1344, and is a popular game in England. It is only 
a few years old in America. In late years it has 
been displaced by base-ball. This last is not likely 
to be long popular, as it is too rough a game, and 
boys are too likely to have their fingers and noses 
broke by the hard ball. Sometimes even eyes are 
knocked out ! There are other kinds of ball-playing 
that answers the purpose of amusement much better. 
The great danger about playing is, that many become 
too fond of it, and so neglect other things. VVe may 
reverse the proverb and say: “All play and no work 
makes Jack a good for nothing boy.” 


THE PASTOR'S WIFE. 

She has some singular ways about her, which jou 
do not like. May be your wife has some queer ways 
about her, which other people do not like. The fact 
is, we all have ways about which we do not like our¬ 
selves. No wonder if our wives are in the same si¬ 
tuation. 


GOOD FEIDAT. 

There is a more general disposition than formerly 
to pay proper regard to this day. Even the money 
establishments on Wall street, New York, last Good 
Friday, closed their places of business. This looks 
as if the stones were beginning to cry out. It is 
time now for Christians to see to it, that they are 
not outdone by “ the children of this world.” Let 
not a single Reformed church be closed on Good 
Friday, or on any other of the holy days of the Chris¬ 
tian year. The churches used to be crowded on these 
days even more than on Sundays. Let the old spirit, 
and with it the good old times of our fathers return. 


STATISTICS OF THE REFORMED CHURCH IH 

1866. 

1 General Synod. 

3 Subordinate Synods. 

29 Classes. 

485 Ministers. 

1,183 Congregations. 

103,925 Members. 

70,432 Unconfirmed Members. 

11,115 Baptisms. 

6,845 Confirmations. 

2,421 Received by Certificate 
91,547 Communicants. 

196 Excommunicated. 

1,244 Dismissed. 

4,207 Deaths. 

939 Sunday-Schools. 

$60,977.46 Benevolent contributions. 


THE CATECHETICAL CLASS. 

Catechising is coming into new honor in our 
Church, of late years. Six thousand eight hundred 
and folty-five catechumens were confirmed during the 
year 1867. Our people used to listen too much to 
the wicked diatribes that were hurled against this 
beautiful and ancient order of the Church, by fana¬ 
tical ignoramuses. Their brute thunder has, to a 
great extent, lost its power. Our people believe that 
their own pastors are as fit to direct them, as bold 
upstarts of yesterday. They do not wish the new 
ways, but say the old are better. Let our people be 
firm, and sustain this excellent order of the Church, 
by word and example. It has proved itself a great 
power. Why should we foolishly neglect it, or ex¬ 
change it for new and doubtful ways? 

11 











MAY, 5th Month, 31 Days. 1868. 


Weeks and 
days. 

Remarkable days. 

Daily Bible 
Lessons. 

Moon! 

R&S. 

h m 1 

Moon’s 

Place. 

[Miscellaneous Particu¬ 
lars. 

s. 

ft. 

in 

SUN 
rises 
h m 

SUN 

sets, 
h m 

C 

CO 

* 

<5 

Friday 

1 

Philip dr Ja. 

John 14, 1-14 

2 20 

# 6 ; 

9 sets 10 50 

3 

5 

7 

6 53 

19 

Saturday 

2 

Siiiismund 

Psalm 51 

2 54 

1= 19 ! 

h rises 7 57 

3 

5 

6 

6 54 

20 

18] 3d Sunday aft. Easter. Gosp. John 16,16-23.Ep. 1 Pet. 2,11-20. Day's length 13 hours 50 min. 

Sunday 

3 

Lnv of Cross 

Psalm 102 

3 22 

sh 2 

Sirius sets 8 59 

3 

5 

5 

6 55 

21 

Monday 

4 

Florianus 

“ 103 

3 59 

sh I 4 

Aldeb. he's 9 37 

3 

5 

4 

6 56 

22 

Tuesday 

5 

Godhard 

“ 104 

4 40 

sh 26 

V rises 3 28 

4 

5 

3 

6 57 

23 

Wednesday 

6 

Dietrich 

“ 118 

rises. 

<* 8 

6th. % ris. 4 2 

4 

5 

2 

6 58 

24 

Thursday 

7 

Godfrey 

James 1 

8 4 

HE 21 

9 gr. dist. east 6 3) h 

4 

5 

1 

6 59 

25 

Friday 

8 

Stanislaus 

“ 2 

8 57 

#• 3 

9 sets 10 53 

4 

5 

0 

7 0 

26 

Saturday 

9 

Job 

“ 3 

9 47 

# 15 

>2 rises 7 29 

4 

4 

59 

7 1 

27 


19] 4 th Sunday aft . Easter. Gosp. John 16, 5-15. Ep. Jas. 1 16-21. Day's length 14 hours 4 min. 


Sunday 

10 

Gordianus 

James 4 

| 10 

40' 

$r 26 

Spica so. 10 8 ^ 

4 

4 58 

7 

2 

[28 

Monday 

11 

John Arndt 

“ 5 

111 

28 

8 

Arcturus so. 10 55 

4 

4 57 

7 

3 

29 

Tuesday 

12 

Pancratius 

Psalm 121 

morn. 

20 

% rises 3 17 

4 

4 56 

7 

4 

30 

Wednesday 

13 

Servatius 

Rev. 1 

12 

10 


$ rises 3 53 

4 

4 55 

7 

5 

M 

Thursday 

14 

Christianus 

“ 3 

12 

46 

14 

14. Or. se. 8 50 

4 

4 54 

7 

6 

2 

Friday 

15 

Sophia 

“ 14 

1 

21 


4 50 super. 6 $ ¥ 

4 

4 53 

7 

7 

3 

Saturday 

16 

Peregrin a 

“ 16 

1 

55 

10 

y 9 sets 10 52 

4 

4 52 

6 

8 

4 


20] 5th Sunday aft. Easter. Gosp. John 16, 23-30. Ep. Jas. 1, 22-27. Day r s length 14 hours 18 min. 


Sunday 

17 

J odocus 

Jude 

2 29 

9 23 

6 D 71 71 rises 3 0 

4 

4 51,7 

9 

5 

Monday 

18 

Y. Herberger 

Rev. 17 

2 59 

6 

Antares rises 8 16 

4 

4 50 

7 

10 

6 

Tuesday 

19 

Potentia 

“ 18 

3 29 

21 

6 ^ % % rises 3 46 

4 

4 49 

7 

11 

7 

Wednesday 

20 

Basilla 

Levit. 7 

3 58 

m s 

Librae south 10 53 

4 

4 48 

7 

12 

8 

Thursday 

21 

Ascension 

Acts 1, Ml 

4 26 

20 

O enters $$ 

4 

4 48 

7 

12 

9 

Friday 

22 

Helena 

Levit. 9 

sets. 


22. $ ris. 8 0 

4 

4 47 

7 13 

10 

Saturday 

23 

Desiderius 

Rev. 19 

8 52 

H 21 

1 <? h O h so. 11 59 

4 

4 46 

7 

14 

11 


21] 6th Sunday aft. Easter. Gosp. John 15, 26-16,4. Ep. 1 Pet. 4,8-11. Day f s length 14 hrs. 28 min. 


Sunday 

24 

Esther 

Esther 2 

9 

53 

HE 6 

6 D ^ 71 se. 2 40 ^ 

3 

4 46 

6 

14 

12 

Monday 

25 

Urbanus 

Acts 3 

10 

48 

HIS 21 

6 D9 9 sets 10 39 

3 

4 45 

7 

15 

13 

Tuesday. 

26 

Beda 

u 

5 

11 

38 

5 

% rises 3 30 

3 

4 44 

7 

16 

14 

Wednesday 

27 

Lucianus 

u 

7 

morn. 

19 

Regulus sets 12 26 

3 

4 43 

7 

17 

15 

Thursday 

28 

William 

u 

8, 1-13 

12 

19 


^^28. $gr.II.l.n.& 

3 

4 43 

7 

17 

16 

Friday 

29 

Christiana 

u 

8, 18 ff 

12 

56 

§1 16 

sjjj/Arctur so. 9 44 

3 

4 42 

7 

18 

17 

Satuiday 

30 

Wigand 

u 

9, 23 ff 

1 

28 

§= 29 

\l south 11 29 

3 

4 41 

7 

19 

18 


22] Whitsuntide. Gosp. John 14 23-31. Ep. Acts, 2, 1-13. Day's length 14 hours 38 min. 


Sunday |31| Whitsunday ||Acts 2, 14 ff [| 1 58| fa ll||Pollux sets 10 52 | 3|4 41|7 19| 19 

Saturn ( \ ) is on the 23d in Opposition with the Sun and shines the whole night. 


MOON’S PHASES. 

Full Moon, 6th “ 1 o’clock 40 min. Afternoon. 

Last Quarter, 14th day, 12 “ 19 “ Afternoon 

New Moon, 22d “ 1 “ 39 “ Morning. 

First Quarter, 28th « 6 “ 44 “ Evening. 


HISTORICAL REMINISCENCES.— May. 

Athanasius, the celebrated patriarch of Alexandria, 
died the 2nd, 373. He was a great defender of the truth 
against errorists, and suffered much for his faithfulness, 
having had to spend about twenty years in banishment 




























































































MAT. 



THE BIRD OF PARADISE. 

This bird is found only in New Guinea and the 
adjacent islands. It is not quite as large as a pigeon. 
They are very beautiful. About the head, neck and 
breast the feathers are velvety and golden. The 
long feathers spring out under the wing, are about 
eighteen inches long, are of many delicate colors and 
downy. Besides, there are two feathers which grow 
out of the tail, and are about three feet long. On 
account of its beauty the natives call this “ the Bird 
of the gods.” The traders, who first brought them 
to Europe for sale, said they came from the terrestrial 
paradise, so as to get large prices for them. Thus 
they received the name, “ Birds of Paradise. 


DO YOU VISIT HIM? 

Do you say your pastor does not often visit you ? 
Perhaps you do not visit him. Is it so ? 

He has social feelings as well as you; and it is no 
more his duty to visit you, than it is yours to visit 
him. Show that you love him by calling on him 
occasionally. This will do him great good. Often 
he is tempted to think his people do not care for 
him, simply because they never call to see him and 
have a friendly chat. Now, do what you can to take 
this burden off his heart, and I assure you he will 
call to see you. 

COUNTRY SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

You generally close them during the winter; but 
that is a great and sad mistake. “Oh,” says some 
one, “the weather and roads forbid it in winter.” 
Then why do you open your week-day school in win¬ 
ter ? Can children stand more cold or wade through 
deeper snow on Monday than on Sunday ? 

Closing your Sunday School during winter is bad 
for both teachers and scholars. 1, It is a loss of 
time; 2, children forget much that they have 
learned; 3, it breaks the interest of many; 4, open¬ 
ing again in Spring is often neglected till late in the 
season; 5, you teach children to sacrifice more for 
their week-day school than for the Sunday School. 

Do you really think it is right to close your school 
through winter ? Bather have it open with even a 
dozen scholars than closed. 


BENEFICIARY EDUCATION. 

There is no object that is more worthy of the be¬ 
nevolence of the Church, than the education of the 
poor young men for the ministry. The Church 
needs more ministers. The demand is constant and 
pressing. Large charges are .divided, new congrega¬ 
tions are organized, some pastors are called to their 
reward—all these places must be filled. No pious 
and talented young man who seeks to enter the mi¬ 
nistry, ought for a moment to be kept back from 
want of funds. Spme young men find themselves 
compelled to teach one or two years during their 
course, in order to make up in needed funds. This 
delays the completion of their course of study, and 
thus, also, their entrance upon the active duties of 
the holy ministry. This ought not so to be. The 
Church is able to support all that apply, to support 
them well, and to support them promptly. Let this 
cause receive, as it richly deserves, the special favor 
of our people. 


13 

















JUNE, 6th Month, 30 Days. 1868. 


Weeks and 
Days. 

Remarkable days. 

Daily Bible 
Lessons. 

Moon 

R.&S. 

h m 

Moon’s 

Place. 

Miscellaneous Particu¬ 
lars. 

s. 

ft. 

m 

SUN 

rises 

h m 

SUN 

sets. 

hm 

1(0. style] 

Monday 

1 

Whitmonday 

John 3, 16-21 

2 28 

ih 23 

9 sets 10 31 ps 

2 

4 40 

7 2.0 

20 

Tuesday 

2 

IT. L. Huebner 

“ 10, 1-11 

2 59 

<#s 6 

6 rises 3 21 

2 

4 39 

7 21 

21 

Wednesday 

3 

Ember day 

Isa. 52 

3 29 

<«£ 18 

6 3) b b so * 11 10 

2 

4 39 

7 21 

22 

Thursday 

4 

Darius 

Dan. 5 

4 1 

«|g 29 

11 rises 1 59 

2 

4 38 

7 22 

23 

Friday 

5 

Bonifacius 

Gen. 1 

rises. 

11 

00 5. Lib. s. 10 14 

2 

4 38 

7 22 

24 

Saturday 

6 

Artenius 

Levit. 33 

8 18 

* 23 

Arct. so. 9 10 

2 

4 38 

7 22 

25 


23] Trinity Sunday . Gosp. John. 3, 1—15. Ep. Rom. 11, 33—66. Day's length 14 hours 46 min 


Sunday 

7 

Paul Gerhard 

Psalm 77 

8 58 


Antar. so. 11 17 ^ 

1 

4 37 

7 23 

26 

Monday 

8 

A. II. Franke 

“ 34 

9 40 


<5 ^ ^ ? set3 10 16 

1 

4 37 

7 23 

27 

Tuesday 

9 

Medardus 

Isa. 52 

10 20 

29 

D apo. $ gr. bril. 

1 

4 37 

7 23 

28 

Wednesday 

10 

Primus 

“ 57 

10 55 


% rises 3 6 

0 

4 37 

7 23 

29 

Thursday 

11 

Barnabas 

Acts 11 

11 25 

f| 23 

b south 10 38 

O) 

4 36 

7 24 

30 

Friday 

12 

Basil ides 

“ 12 

11 59 

S 6 

/^We. s. 1 12 y 

1 

4 36 

7 24 

31 

Saturday 

13 

Tobias 

“ 13 

morn. 

1 q 

13. 2 sets 10 3 


4 36 

7 24 

J 

24] 1st Sunday aft. Trinity. Gosp. Luke 16,19-31. 

Ep. 1 John 4, 16-21. Day's length 14 hrs. 48 

m. 

Sunday 

14 

Heliseus 

Gen. 6 

12 32 

2 

6 D % X sets 1 12 

0 

4 35 

7 25 

2 

Monday 

15 

Vitus 

“ 7 

1 6 

15 

2 sets 8 20 

0 

4 35 

7 25 

3 

Tuesday 

16 

Rolandus 

“ 8 

1 40 

29 

2 gr. dist east 

1 

4 35 

7 25 

4 

Wednesday 

17 

Laura 

“ 11 

2 18 

P9 14 

1 6 ]) S % rises 2 40 

1 

4 35 

7 25 

5 

Thursday 

18 

Arnolphus 

“ 13 

2 59 

29 

2 sets 9 40 

1 

4 35 

7 25 

6 

Friday 

19 

GervasiUs 

“ 14 

3 59 

W 14 

h so. 10 6 rs 

1 

4 35 

7 25 

7 

Saturday 

20 

Syverius 

“ 15 

sets. 

W 29 

20. O m* L. D. 

1 

4 34 

7 26 

8 


25] 2d Sunday aft Trinity. Gosp. Luke 14,16-24. Ep. 1 John 3,13-18. Day's length 14 hrs. 50 min. 


Sunday 

21 

Raphael 

Gen. 17 

8 29 

«“§* 14 

6 ]) $ Sum. Com 

1 

4 35 

7 25 

9 

Monday 

22 

Achatius 

“ 18 

9 22 

*16 29 

D 6 $ $ 9 sets 9 16 

2 

4 35 

7 25 

10 

Tuesday 

23 

Agrippina 

“ 19 

10 8 

SSP 14 

9 stationary 

2 

4 35 

7 25 

11 

Wednesday 

24 

John , Baptist 

Luke 1, 57-80 

10 49 


% rises 12 42 

2 

4 35 

7 25 

12 

Thursday 

25 

Augsb Conf. 

1 Tim. 6 

11 24 

& 12 

£2 Regul. se. 10 24 

2 

4 35 

7 25 

13 

Friday 

26 

Jeremiah 

Jer. 1 

11 55 

& 26 

^ b south 9 39 
27. % ris. 2 22 

2 

4 35 

7 25 

14 

Saturday 

27 

7 Sleepers 

“ 2 

morn. 

& 3 

3 

4 35 

V 25 

15 

26] 3d Sunday aft. Trinity. 

Gosp. Lukel5,1 

-lo. : 

Ep. 1 Pet 5, 6-11. Day's length \Ahrs. 48 min. 

Sunday 

28 

Leo 

Gen. 20 1 

112 22 


! 9 sets 8 46 

1 3!4 3617 24 

16 

Monday 

29 

Peter & Paul 

Matth.16,13ff.! 

112 52 

20] 

Wega south 11 57 

j 3;4 36i7 24 

17 

Tuesday 

30 

Lucina 

Gen. 22 j 

j 1 30 

15| 

£ stationary 

1 3 5 36|7 24 

18 


MOON’S PHASES. 


HISTORICAL REMINISCENCES.— June. 


Full Moon, 5th day, 1 o’clock 5T min. Morning. 

Last Quarter, 13th “ 5 “ 14 “ Morning. 

New Moon, 20th “ 9 “ 44 “ Morning. 

First Quarter, 27th “ 12 “ 47 u Morning. 


Justin, celebrated for his writings in defence of 
Christianity, was beheaded at Rome, the 12th, 165. He 
is said to have preached in Italy and Egypt, and was well 
versed in philosophy as well as in theology. 





























































































JUNE. 



BIRDS. 


Worms and insects destroy fruit-trees and their 
fruit. The birds destroy insects, and are thus the 
true friends of man. They work for us as well as 
sing for us. We ought to be their friends. Boys, 
let their eggs and their nests alone. 

ALMS. 

In former times it was the custom to use all the 
money collected at the regular Lord’s day service as 
alms. It was called “poor money.” This is the true 
scriptural idea. Alms giving is a part of worship. 
We offer to God not merely the fruits of the heart 
and the lips, but also of that property which God 
has given us. He does not need this, but his poor 
people need it. Hence what is thus given in wor¬ 
ship is to be used for the poor, and for the spread 
of Christ’s kingdom in the world. This good and 
scriptural custom was for a time lost sight of. The 
alms were diverted from their original purpose, and 


used to defray the common expenses of the congre¬ 
gation. Fuel, light, and sexton’s wages were paid 
out of the alms. This perversion ought to be at 
once corrected in all our churches. Synod has di 
rected the true Scripture custom to be restored 
Many congregations have already introduced again 
the old practice of alms-giving. It is to be hoped 
that every congregation which has not yet done it, 
will attend to it as soon as possible. How can a 
church expect to prosper which robs God, His poor, 
and His cause, of that which His word so clearly 
claims?—The current expenses of the congregation 
can be provided for in some other way. 

The General Synod, at Dayton, last November, 
passed the following act on this subject: 

“Resolvedy That the District Synods be, and are 
hereby requested to urge, through the Classes, upon 
all their ministers and congregations, the duty of 
devoting the regular collections in divine service; 
'either to the poor or other benevolent objects of the 
Church, as a truly Scriptural plan of systematic be¬ 
nevolence, instead of applying them to the current 
expenses of the congregation; and that these ex¬ 
penses be. provided for as the pastor’s salary, or in 
some other way; and further, that all congregations 
be urged to revive such collections where they have 
been neglected.” 

Let this wisdom of the highest council of the 
Church be faithfully carried into effect. 


THE HOLT DAYS. 

It is a good sign of the times, that the holy days 
of the Church are being much more generally observed 
than formerly. The papers of the Church during 
the year 1867, gave us glowing accounts of the joy 
of Christmas, the solemnities of Good Friday, Easter, 
Ascension Day and Whitsuntide. This is a sign 
that the old glorious churchly feeling is returning 
amongst us. Let pastors and people work together 
in leading the congregations to follow our blessed 
Lord through these commemorative scenes and events 
of His life on earth. It is highly edifying and in¬ 
structive to parents and children. Let the gates of 
Zion in all places be thrown wide open on these 
great days of solemn jubilee, that the multitudes of 
Christ’s faithful children may 

“ Crown His gates with thankful songs, 

High as the heavens their voices raise; 

And earth with her ten thousand tongues 
Resound His everlasting praise.” 


15 










JULY, 7th Month, 31 Days. 1868. 


Weeks and 
Days. 

Remarkable days. 

Daily Bible 
Lessons. 

Moon 
R.&S. 
h m 

Moon's 

Place. 

Miscellaneous Particu¬ 
lars. 

s 

si. 

m 

SUN 

rises 

h m 

SUN 

sets, 
h in 

O 

xn 

ctT 1 

Wednesday 

1 

Theobald 

Gen. 23 

2 5 

•«g 27 

6 D h O in apo. 

3 

4 36 

7 24 

19 

Thursday 

2 

Visit. V. M. 

Luke 1, 26-56 

2 41 

§c 9 

9 se's 8 30 

4 

4 37 

7 23 

20 

Friday 

3 

Cornelius 

Acts 10, 1 38 

3 24 

& 20 

rises 12 12 

4 

4 37 

7 23 

21 

Saturday 

4 

Independence 

Rom. 13 

rises. 

2 

6 

4 

4 37 

7 23 

22 


27] 4th Sunday aft. Trinity. Gosp Luke. 6, 36-42. Ep.Roin. 8,18-23. Day’s length 14 hours 44 min. 


Sunday 

5 

Demetrius 

Acts 19 

7 

56 

>8^14 

h south 8 44 

4 

4. 38 

7 22 

23 

Monday 

6 

John Russ 

Psalm 26 

8 

30 

^26 

Antares so. 9 26 

4 

4 38 

7 

22 

24 

Tuesday 

7 

Edelburga 

Gen. 25 

9 

15 


D in apo. 9 se. 8 12 

5 

4 39 

7 

21 

25 

Wednesday 

8 

Aquilla 

Acts 20 

9 47 

|| 20 

£5 $ rises 2 16 

5 

4 39 

7 

21 

26 

Thursday 

9 

Zeno 

Gen. 26 

10 

18 

O 

<5* ° 

Dog Days com. 

5 

4 39 

7 

21 

27 

Friday 

10 

Calvin 

“ 32 

10 

49 

9 15 

Regulus sets 9 24 

5 

4 40 

7 

20 

28 

Saturday 

11 

Pius 

“ 33 

11 

20 

9 28 

h south 8 22 

5 

4 40 

7 

20 

29 


28] 5 th Sunday aft. Trinity. Gosp. Luke 5,1-11. Ep. 1 Pet. 3,8—15. Day's length 14 hours 38 min. 


Sunday 

12 

Henry 

Gen. 35 

morn. 

12 

4JM2. ^ri 11 40 

5 

4 41 

7 

19 

30 

Monday 

13 

Margaet 

“ 37 

12 7 

25 

^ Wega so. 11 0 

5 

4 41 

7 

19 

J. 

Tuesday 

14 

Bonavent 

“ 39 

12 45 

M 9 

6 5 0 inferior 

5 

4 42 

7 

18 

2 

Wednesday 

15 

Apostle’s day 

Matth. 10 

1 20 

PS? 23 

% rises 2 8 

6 

4 43 

7 

17 

3 

Thursday 

16 

Ruth 

Ruth 1 

1 55 

ft 8 

6 (£ % 6 9 ©inferior 

6 

4 43 

7 

17 

4 

Friday 

17 

Alexius 

Gen. 40 

2 30 


Spica se. 10 56 py 

6 

4 44 

7 

16 

5 

Saturday 

18 

Mater nus 

“ 41 

3 21 


<5 C ¥ b se. 12 55 

6 

4 45 

7 

15 

6 


29] 6th Sunday aft. Trinity. Gosp. Matt. 5, 20-26. Ep. Rom. 6, 3-11. Day’s length 14 hours 28 mtn* 


Sunday 

19 

Ruffina 

Gen. 42 

sets. 

m 2 3 

Jj|19th. J) 6 5 9 

6 

4 46 

7 

14 

7 

Monday 

20 

Elias 

l Kings 17 

7 54 

8 

D per. %r\. 111 

6 

4 46 

7 

14 

8 

Tuesday 

21 

Praxedes 

Exodus 34 

8 38 

22 

5 great Hel. lat. so. 

6 

4 47 

7 

13 

9 

Wednesday 

22 

Mary Magd. 

Luke 7, 36 50 

9 14 

& 6 

O enters 

6 

4 48 

7 

12 

10 

Thursday 

23 

Apollinaris 

Gen. 44 

9 49 

& 20 

Altair south 11 32 

6 

4 49 

7 

11 

11 

Friday 

24 

Christiana 

“ 45 

10 22 

A 4 

5 stationary 

6 

4 50 

7 

10 

12 

Saturday 

25 

St. James 

Matth. 20,20ff 

10 54 

A 15 

Pollux sets 8 19 

6 

4 51 

6 

9 

13 


30] 7 th Sunday aft. Trinity. Gosp. Mark. 8,1-9. Ep. Rom. 6,19-23. Day’s length 1 6 hours 16 min. 


Sunday 

26 

St Anne 

1 Sam. 2 

11 

25 

29 

^|^26. 9 in Aphel. 

6 

4 52 

7 

8 

14 

Monday 

27 

Martha 

John 11 

11 

58 


sjjg) 6 9 5 10 39 

6 

4 52 

7 

8 

15 

Tuesday 

28 

Pantaleon 

Gen. 46 

morn. 

^flf 23 

6 j) h b sets 12 15 

6 

4 53 

7 

7 

16 

Wednesday 

29 

Beatrix 

“ 47 

12 

30 


9 ris. 3 50 mornst. 

6 

A 54 

7 

6 

17 

Thursday 

30 

Abdon 

“ 48 

1 

11 

17 

% rises 1 50 

6 

4 55 

7 

5 

18 

Friday 

31 

Germanus 

“ 49 

1 

52 

h 29 

Aldeb ri. 11 49 

6 

4 56 

7 

4 

19 


Venus ( 9 ) is on the 16th in superior Conjunction with the Sun, and passes from Evening to 

Mornings Star. 


MOON’S PHASES. 

Pull Moon, 4th day, 3 o’clock 35 min. Afternoon. 
Last Quarter, 12th “ 7 “ 85 “ Evening. 

New Moon, 19th “ 4 “ 50 u Afternoon. 

First Quarter 26th “ 8 *•* 45 “ Morning. 


HISTORICAL REMINISCENCES.— January. 

Ulrica the pious Bishop of Augsburg, who did 
much to save the city from destruction by his prayers, 
died the 4th 973. 

Canute the great. King of Denmark, whose rule ex¬ 
tended to a great part of northern Europe, and who 
introduced Christianity among his people through mis¬ 
sionaries from England, died the 10th, 1036. 




























































































JULY, 



EN STICK tiWEB’S AERNDEFELD, 


Was macht der Druckcr do for G'frUs? 

Bell basst yo gar net now a days, 

Die Mad hen meh Yerstand. 

En Madel now im Aerndefeld 
War gut for Aagaweh ! 

Uf so en Scene sin des my Strictures : 

Sell los da Poets un’ da Pictures, 

’S is nix in our day. 

W T er now en Aernde-Picture maelxt, 

Losst Mad’ un’ Sichel wek; 

Spannt Geil in Reaper, wie en Stage, 

Dann gebt’s ahead in perfect rage, 

Un' kracht in alle Eck. 

Wer des geplan’d hot, der verdient 
Die thanks von every soul; 

Un* docli en manclier dummer Trop, 

Yerlacht dcsStudya mit dem Kop— 

Sei eg’nes kan er wohl! 

IS NOT THIS TRUE? 

These families that take the church papers and 
read th m, we find are far the most active and nseful 
in the Church. They know where we have churches 
and where we ought to have them. They know 
where our Colleges and Seminaries are and how they 
are prospering. If only every family would take 
some of our church papers, how much better it would 
be for them and for the Church. An ignorant faith 
is dead. It is true we have the ministers to teach 
ua from the pulpit; but there are many things in the 
church papers that we ought to know, of which the 
minister has not time to tell us on Sunday. Ask 
your pastor to get you a church paper, which he will 
cheerfully do, if you hand him the money. 

GOD'S PLAN. 

In September, 1866, the Apostolic plan of alms- 
giving as a part of worship in every Lord’s day ser¬ 
vice, was formally adopted by Westmoreland Glassis, 
and recommended for practical introduction among 
the people. It works well. All that is necessary, 
is, that the people should have the plan explained to 
them. Many of the people already bring their gifts 
every Lord’s day and cast them into the treasury. 
The widow brings her mite, and those more blessed 
in this world’s goods bring their larger offerings. 
Our people are learning, that in this way, as well as 
by singing and praying, can we, and ought we to 
worship God. This is the old way: this is God’s plan. 


TOM CALENNERMAN UPO’SEIZ-T. 

Die gold’ne Aern is wider do, 

Die Hoyet is verhei; 

Die geele Felder gucka fr.oh, 

^ie wava scho im Wind, yoji know- 
Un’ Marga ge’en mV nei. 

MY hot als mit der Sichel gYupt— 
Wo’s g’sfanna hot gerefit; 

Des war en Elehd many a day, 
YonSchwitza up’ von Buckelweh, 
Un’ soreness right un’ left. 

Der Picture, wo do owa steht, 

Is weit behind the age ; 

MY laeht wann m’r en Sichel avLi, 
,Un’ even’s Beffis ausgeplay’d— 
Reapers sin now die rage. 


En Sichel un’ en Watzaschiib 
Hot’s Madel iu der Hand! 






AUGUST, 


8th Month, 31 Days. 


1868, 


AVeeks and 
Days. 


Remarkable days. 


Daily Bible 
Lessons. 


Moon 

R.&S. 
h m 


Moon’ s 
Place. 


Miscellaneous Par¬ 
ticulars. 


s. 

SUN 

SUN 

si 

rises 

^sets. 

m 

b m 

h tn 


Saturday | 11 Lammas Day ||Gen. 50 


2 37|va^ ll|[y rises 10 10 y | 6)4 57|7 3|20 


31] 8 th Sunday aft. Trinity Gosp. Matth. 7,15-23. Ep. Rom. 8,12-17. Day’s length 14 hours 4 min. 


Sunday 

2 

Gus. Adolphus 

Psalm 73 

3 26 

23j;>2 stationary 

6 

4 58 

7 2 

21 

Monday 

3 

Augustus 

Exodus 1 

rises. 


£ gr. di. we. 

6 

4 59 

7 1 

22 

Tuesday 

4 

Dominick 

“ 3 

7 42 

^ 17i' 

5 rises 4 30 

6 

5 

0 

7 0 

23 

Wednesday 

5 

Oswald 

“ 5 

8 18 

ft 

9 rises 3 15 

6 

5 

1 

6 59 

24 

Thursday 

,6 

Tr. of Christ 

Mark 9 

8 50 

xs* iq 

% rises 1 38 

6 

5 

2 

6 58 

25 

Friday 

7 

Donatus 

Exodus 7 

9 24 

3S 26 i 

9 stationary 

6 

5 

3 

6 57 

26 

Saturday 

8 

Emilius 

“ 8 

9 59 

9j 

6 D y. % rises 9 44 

5 

5 

4 

6 56 

27 


32] 9 th Sunday aft. Trinity. Gosp. Luke 16 1-9,. Ep. 1 Cor. 10, 6-13. Day’s length 13 hours 50 min . 


Sunday 

9 

Ericus 

u 

9 

10 

34 

22 

h sets 11 27 

5 

5 

5 

6 55 

28 

Monday 

10 

St. Lawrence 

John 12 

!, 24 ff. 

11 

10 

$$ 5 

/^^Orion ris. 2 1 

5 

5 

6 

6 54 

29 

Tuesday 

11 

Titus 

Titus 1 


11 

41 

pa? 19 

\£<11. Fo - s - 1 25 

5 

5 

7 

6 53 

30 

Wednesday 

12 

Clara 

Exodus 

10 

morn. 

ft 3 

7* rises 10 45 

5 

5 

9 

6 51 

31 

Thursday 

13 

Hildebert 

u 

11 

12 

24 

II 18 

2J. rises 9 20 

5 

5 

10 

6 50 

A. 

Friday 

14 

Eusebius 

u 

12 

1 

10 

» 8 S 3 

6])U ris. 1 22 w 

4 

5 

11 

6 49 

2 

•Saturday 

15 

Assn. V. M. 

u 

13 

2 

10 

17 

D 6 # 9 $ ri 2 42 

4 

5 

12 

6 48 

3 


33] 10/A Sunday aft Trinity. Gosp. Luke 19,41M8. Ep. ICor. 12,1-11. Day’s length 13 hours 34 miiu 


Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 


16 

Rochus 

Exodus 

14 

3 14 

2 

h sets 11 1 

4 

5 

13 

6 47 

4 

17 

Bertram 

u 

15 

4 20 

16 

5 D 5 9 gr. Hel. 1. so. 

4 

5 

14 

6 46 

5 

18 

John Gerhard 

u 

16 

sets: 


J|kl 8 . $ ri. 4 25 Q 

4 

5 

15 

6 45 

6 

19 

Sebaldus 

a 

17 

7 46 

1= 14 

21 rises 8 46 

3 

5 

17 

6 43 

7 

20 

Bernard 

u 

18 

8 25 

28 

% rises 1 5 

3 

5 

18 

6 42 

8 

21 

Rebecca 

Gen. 24 


8 56 

ih 11 

9 greatest brillian. 

3 

5 

19 

6 41 

9 

22 

Philibert 

Exodus 19 

9 30 

A 24 

□ h O 9 ris. 2 29 

3 

5 

20 

6 40 

10 


34] II th Sunday aft. Trinity. Gosp. Luke 18, 9-14. Ep. ICor. 15,1-10. Day’s length 13 hours 18 min. 


Sunday 

23 

Zaccheus 

Luke 19 1-10 

!10 

4 

m 7 

o enters 

2 

5 2116 39 

11 

Monday 

24 

St. Barthol. 

“ 22 24 10 

10 

40 

5|£ 20 

re l|\24. I). Days end. 

2 

5 2316 37 

12 

Tuesday 

25 

Ludovicus 

Exodus 20 

11 

30 

Sc 2 

vjl y h sets 10 31 

2 

5 2416 36 

13 

Wednesday 

26 

Samuel 

1 Sam 1 

morn. 

ifr 14 

% rises 8 10 

2 

5 25 6 35 

14 

Thursday 

27 

Gebhard 

Exodus 24 

12 

10 

Sc 26 

9 rises 2 13 w 

1 

5 27 

6 33 

15 

Friday 

28 

St. Augustin 

“ 32 

12 

55 

^ 7 

6 5 G superior 

1 

5 28 

6 32 

16 

Saturday 

29 

St. John hell. 

Matth. 14 

1 

49 

19 

% rises 12 46 

1 

5 29 

6 31 

17 


35] 12/A Sunday aft. Trinity. Gosp. Mark 7, 31-37. Ep. 2 Cor. 3,4-11. Day’s length 13 hours 0 min. 


Sunday 

Monday 


Benjamin 

Paulinus 


IGen. 43 
jExodus 33 


2 

491 g 

% 1 

3 

48! ^ 

| 14 


D apo. Alt. so. 9 8 
?5 Wega so. 7 54 


0 

5 30 

6 30 

0 

5 31 

6 29 


18 

19 


MOON’S PHASES. 

Full Moon, 3rd day, 6 o’clock 45 min. Morning. 

Last Quarter, 11th “ 7 “ 23 41 Morning. 

New Moon, 18th « 12 “ 7 ** Morning. 

First Quarter 24th ** 7 “ 44 “ Evening. 


HISTORICAL REMINISCENCES.— August. 
Augustine, who occupied a very high position in the 
ancient history of the Church and whose writings are 
still read with interest and profit, died the 28th, 430. 

! bncH **-•( •«' 


































































































AUGUST. 




SAFE OYER THE RIVER, 


THE GRAVEYARD. 

Graveyards are sacred places. There lie the bodies 
of our beloved dead, in hope of a blessed resurrec¬ 
tion. Let them be frequently and devoutly visited. 
Keep them clear of thorns and briars—the symbols 
of the curse. It is said that the dark of the moon 
and sun of the lovely August is the best time. Try 
it. Keep the sod green above the graves, and plant 
flowers thereon. See that the walls and fences are 
in good repair, and shade the whole ground with 
trees. A congregation that lets weeds and briars 
overgrow the resting place of its dead, must also be 
able to find a good many weeds and briars in the 
hearts of the people. Let both be rooted out. 


What a beautiful lesson we learn from the third 
chapter of Joshua! After forty years wandering in 
the wilderness, the children of Israel passed through 
the Jordan into the promised land of Canaan. 

So after the Christian passes through the cares 
and sorrows of this earthly life, he readily crosses 
the Jordan of death, and enters into the rest that 
remaineth for the people of God. 


0? * f 

IjLI 


THE PAPERS OF THE CHURCH. 

Every member, or at least every family in the 
Church, that is able to do it, ought to take one or 
more of the papers of the Church. Here they are: 

ENGLISH. 

Reformed Church Messenger, published weekly. 
Edited by Rev. S. R. Fisher, D.D., No. 54 North 
Sixth St,, Philada. 

Quarto Edition,. $3.00 in advance. 

Folio “ .. 1.75 “ 

“ 11 10 copies to one address, 15.00 u - 

The Western Missionary. Weekly, Dayton, O., at 
$2. Rev. T. P. Bucher, Editor. 

The CliilcTs Treasury. An illustrated monthly 
Sunday School paper, published by S. R. Fisher & 
Co , Philada. Terms: Ten copies for $2; Twenty- 
five copies for $4.50; Fifty copies for $8; One hun¬ 
dred copies for $15. 

The Guardian. A monthly Magazine of 32 pages, 
devoted to the social, literary and religious interests 
of young men and ladies. Published by S. R. 
Fisher & Co., Philada. Rev. B. Bausman, A.M 
Editor. $1.50 per year. 

The Mercershurg Review. Quarterly. Edited by 
Rev. H. Harbaugh, D.D., and published by S. R. 
Fisher & Co., Philada. Each number contains 160 
pages. $3 per year. 

GERMAN. 

Die Reformirte Kir chen see it u>-g. Weekly, at $1.50- 
Edited by Rev. N. Gehr. and published by S. R. 
Fisher & Co., Philada. This is the oldest German 
religious paper in the country. 

Der Reformirte IZgwfreund. Edited and pub¬ 
lished by Rev. B. Bausman, Reading, Pa. It ap¬ 
pears every two weeks at $1 per year. 

Der Evangelist, Cleveland, Ohio. Weekly, at $1.50. 
Rev. H. J. Ruetenik, Editor. 

Der Reformirte Wdchter. Quarterly. $1 per 
year. Edited and published by Rev. H. J. Rue¬ 
tenik, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Lammerhirte, a child’s paper. Published by S. 
R. Fisher & Co, Philada. Terms: Five copies 
$1.25 ; Ten copies for $2; Twenty five copies for $5; 
Fifty copies for $10; One hundred copies for $18. 

SantagschuJblatt, monthly, by the Ger Ref. Buch- 
verein, Cleveland, Ohio. T rms: The same as those 
of the “ Liimmerhirte.” 


19 

















SEPTEMBER, 


9 th Month, 30 Days. 


1868. 


Weeks and 
days. 

Remarkable days. 

Daily Bible 
Lessons. 

Moonl 
R &S. 
h m 1 

Moon's 
; Place. 

Miscellaneous Particu¬ 
lars. 

s. 

ft. 

m 

SUN 
rises 
h m 

SUN 

sets, 
h m 

O 

as 

< 2 . 

o 

Tuesday 

1 

Egidius 

Num. 14 

rises. 

4 26 i 

4 g&tl. ? ri. 2 12 u 

0 

5 32 

6 28 

20 

Wednesday 

2 

Eliza 

“ 15 

6 57 

K&- o! 

a 

% rises 12 40 

1 

5 34 

6 20 

21 

Thursday 

3 

Mansuetus 

“ 16 

7 30 

oo 

\l sets 9 59 

1 

5 35 

6 25122 

Friday 

4 

Moses 

Exodus 2 

8 3 

<$0* 5 

6 D 11 % rises 7 39 

1 

5 37 

6 23 

23 

Saturday 

5 

Nathaniel 

John 1, 29 ff. 

8 36 

Q# 19 

Sirius rises 2 40 

2 

5 38 

6 22 

24 


36] 13M, Sunday aft. Trinity. Gosp.Luke 10, 23-37. Ep. Gal.3,15-22. Days length 12 hours 42 min. 


Sunday 

6 

Magnus 

fl Cor. 2 

| 9 9 

I 

Rigel rises 11 38 

2 

5 39 

6 

21 

25 

Monday 

7 

Regina 

“ 13 

] - 9 47 

M ™ 

Orion rises 12 19 

2 

5 40 

6 

20 

26 

Tuesday 

8 

Mat. V. M. 

Matth. 1 , 1-16 

10 31 


/^^Ant. se 9 36 

3 

5 41 

6 

19 

27 

Wednesday 

9 

Bruno 

Num. 24 

11 20 

|| 14 

\^^9th. 9 ri. 2 10 

3 

5 43 

6 

17 

28 

Thursday 

10 

Pulcheria 

Deut. 4 

morn. 

ff 29 

Mark. so. 1C 43 ^ 

3 

5 44 

6 

16 

29 

Friday 

11 

Protus 

« 5 

12 12 

i3 

D 6 $ $ £ ri. 12 31 

4 

5 45 

6 

15 

30 

Saturday 

12 

J. Wickliffe 

“ 6 

—-£— 44_^_s_ _ 

1. 14jǤg 27 

h sets 9 32 

4 

5 47 

6 

13 

31 


37] 14:th Sunday aft. Trinity. Gosp. Luke 17,11-19. Ep. Gal. 5 16-24. Day’s length 12 hours 24 min. 


Sunday 

13 

A mat us 

Deut. 7 

2 20 

f# Uf 

6 D 9 9 rises 2 9 

4 5 48 

6 

12 

8. 

Monday 

14 

Elev. Holy *fi 

John 12, 31 ff. 

3 25 

s# 25 

Q 7* rises 8 43 

5 

5 49 

6 

11 

‘> 
Li 

Tuesday 

15 

Nicomedes 

Deut. 7 

4 30 


J) in perigee 

5 

5 51 

6 

9 

3 

Wednesday 

16 

Emherday 

“ 8 

sets. 

^ 23 

|g|16. Aid. r. 9 5 

5 

5 53 

6 

7 

4 

Thursday 

17 

jLampertus 

“ 9 

7 4 

s4 6 

^f|||pSirius ri. 1 57 

6 

5 55 

6 

5 

5 

Friday 

18 

Siegfried 

“ 10 

7 36 

& 19 

h sets 9 16 

6 

5 56 

6 

4 

6 

Saturday 

19 

jMieleta 

“ 27 

8 8 

m 2 

% rises 12 22 

6 

5 57 

6 

3 

7 


38] 15 th Sunday aft. Trinity. Gosp. Matth. 6 , 24-34. Ep. Gal. 5, 25-6,10 Days length 12 hours 2 min. 


Sunday 

20 

Faust a 

Deut. 28 

8 48 

^ 15 

9 rises 2 13 

715 58 

16 2 

8 

Monday 

21 

St. Matthew 

Matth. 9, 9-13 

9 36 

yifc 27 

6 3 ) b h sets 9 8 

7 5 59 

6 i 

9 

Tuesday 

22 

Maurice 

Deut. 29 

10 24 

W 9 

Oent. ^ clay & night eq. 

7 6 

0 

6 0 

10 

Wednesday 

23 

H. Mueller d. 

“ 30 

11 29 

21 

^^23. Jut. Com. 

8 6 

1 

5 59 

11 

Thursday 

24 

St. John con. 

“ 31 

morn. 

3 

sJP? Ant. se. 8 37 p* 

Si 6 

3 

5 57 

12 

Friday 

25 

Cleophas 

“ 32 

12 18 

^15 

9 great dis£. west 

816 

4 

5 56 

13 

Saturday 

26 

J ustina 

“ 33 

1 16 

27 

Mark ab so. 10 45 

9 1 6 

5 

5 55 

14 


39] \Qth Sunday aft. Trinity. Gosp. Luke 7,11-17. Ep. Eph. 3,13-21. Day’s length 11 hrs. 46 min. 


Sunday 

27 

Oosmus 

Deut. 34 

2 12 


9 

D apa. % rises 12 16 

9 

6 

7 

[5 53 

15 

Monday 

28 

Wenceslaus 

Josh. 1 

3 

10 

^: 

21 

9 rises 2 18 

9 

6 

8 

5 52 

16 

Tuesday 

29 

St. Michael 

Matth. 18,1-11 

4 

8 


4 

y gr. Del. lat. no. 

10 

6 

9 

5 51. 

17 

Wednesday 

30 

J erome 

Josh. 2 

5 

2 

4&K 

17 

h sets 8 30 

10 

6 

10 

5 50 

18 


MOON’S PHASES. 

Full Moon, the 1st day 10 o'clock 56 min. Evening. 


Last Quarter, 14th u 6 u 7 “ 

New Moon, 16th “ 8 “ 24 “ 

First Quarter, 23d “ 10 “ 10 % 


Evening. 

Morning. 

Morning. 


tMtl 


HISTORICAL REMINISCENCES.— May. 
Cyprian, an eminent writer of the Church, suffered 
martyrdom, on the 28th, 258. He took a very active 
part in the doctrinal discussions of his time and exer 
oised much influence! . .. j [ 

„ U ■ iff? .t £ bile Tide il? 


1 1 'iUJ 

b* nJ k 


>bq 

- 












































































































SEPTEMBER, 



NYMPHS OF THE SEASONS. 


BY MRS. SCHAFER. 

SPRING. 

Spring is coming, birds are singing, 

Tis a merry note they tel!; 

Winter with its frosty mantle 
Has for once more bid farewell; 

See in yonder valley sporting 
Are the youngsters blithe and gay, 
Wreathed in garlands of sweet flowers, 
Welcome to the month of May. 

See the fruit trees robed in beauty, 
Promising delicious fruit, 

Thus the Lord, our kind Creator, 

Doth provide our daily food. 

SUMMER. 

Next comes Summer bringing plenty, 
Fields now wave with golden grain, 

And the farmer with his reaper 
Cuts it down without restrain ; 

Soon the barns are filled with plenty, 
Food for cattle and for men, 

And ere long, the thresher’s music 
Fills the air through every glen. 

See, the father and his matron 
Are obeyed at their command, 

While the young are merrily toiling 
Singing like a happy band. 

AUTUMN. 

Autumn fills the empty garner. 

Vines with purple clusters bend, 

While the fruit trees wave their branches 
Welcoming the hungry friend. 
Husbandmen now fill their eellarg, 

Busy wives their fruit prepare; 

Some are drying, others canning, 

Finding labor every where. 


Soon the tall tree of the forest, 

Sheds its leaves now turning gray, 
And the flowers that now are fragrant 
Soon will wither and decay. 


AN EXAMPLE-PLEASE COPY. 

Molly Heimbach is about 65 years of age. She is 
a Christian, a regular attendant of the Reformed 
Church in one of the villages of Somerset county > 
Pa. She lives in a small room, with her bed and 
stove, and chest, and a few other simple articles of 
furniture all in the same room. She is poor in this 
world’s goods. She makes a living by washing, 
making garden, and spinning for the neighbors. 
Her pastor introduced systematic benevolence, ask¬ 
ing the members to give a certain amount for mis¬ 
sions, beneficiary education, etc., during the year, 
and pay it quarterly. Molly came up to the pastor 
as soon as the congregation was dismissed and asked 
him to put down a quarter of a dollar for her for 
every three months. Her pastor told her, that that 
would be a dollar a year, which was too much for 
her to give. She said she understood all about it, 
and that she could give that amount. Molly Heim¬ 
bach was the first one in that congregation to pay 
her dollar to the good cause. “She paid more than 
they all.”__ 

WHO IS UNDER OBLIGATIONS? 

So you think you will take the Messenger another 
year, just to favor the Printing Office? 

You need not think so. You are not favoring 
the office, but yourself. This is the right view. The 
paper is published not to make money, but to in¬ 
struct and inform the people. 

To do without the church paper, therefore, is not 
an injury to the Board of Publication, but to your¬ 
self.—Do you see the point? 


WINTER. 

Winter with its frosty mornings 
Nip the buds that yet remain, 
And ere long the snowy mantle 
Will be spread o’er hill and plain. 
Then the bells will jingle, jingle, 
As the youngsters glide away, 
While the aged by their fireside, 
Spend their lonely winter-day. 

Life at best is but a shadow, 

Years but come to pass away, 

And we may, ere this is ended, 
Lie where our frail forms decay. 


21 









OCTOBER, l$th Month, 31 Days. 1808. 


Weeks and 
Days. 

Remarkable days. 

Daily Bible 
Lessons. 

Moon 
R.&S. 
h m 

Moon’s 

Place. 

Miscellaneous Particu¬ 
lars. 

s 

si. 

m 

SUN 
rises 
h m 

SUN 

sets, 
h in 

p 

CD 

CD 

Thursday 

I 

Remigius 

Josh. 3 

rises. 

OTP 0 

6 D % 

10 

6 11 

5 49 

19 

Friday 

2 

C. Columbus 

“ 4 

6 40 

14 

i 9 rises ^ 22 

11 

6 12 

5 48 

20 

Saturday 

3 

J airus 

Mark 5 

7 20 

•1#28 

\y south 11 40 

11 

6 14 

5 46 

21 

40] 17 th Sunday aft. Trinity. 

Gosp. Luke. 14,1-11. 

Ep. Eph. 4,1-16. Day's length 11 hours 30 min. 

Sunday 

4 

Franciscus 

Josh. 6 

8 2 

V® 12 

h sets 8 12 

11 

6 15 

5 45 

22 

Monday 

5 

Placidus 

“ 20 

8 46 

27 

Orion rises 10 37 

12 

6 16 

5 44 

23 

Tuesday 

6 

Fides 

“ 23 

9 26 

12 

Sirius rises 12 47 

12 

6 18 

5 42 

24 

Wednesday 

7 

Muehlenberg 

“ 24 

10 20 

26 

Antar. se. 7 52^ 

12 

6 19 

5 41 

25 

Thursday 

8 

Pelagius 

Judges 2 

11 17 


"' < ||vAnd. so. 11 5 

12 

6 20 

5 40 

26 

Friday 

9 

Dionysius 

“ 4 

morn. 

HIS 24 

^jg/Oth. <5 D $ 

13 

6 22 

5 38 

27 

Saturday 

10 

Gideon 

“ 7 

12 29 

8 

□ # O % rises 12 8 

13 

6 23 

5 37 

28 


41] 18/7i Sunday aft. Trinity. Gosp. Matth.22, 34-46. Ep. 1 Cor. 1, 4-9. Day's length 11 hours 12 min. 


Sunday 

11 

Burk hard 

Judges 5 

1 30 

5^* 22 

2/ south 11 20 

13 

6 

24 

5 36 

29 

Monday 

12 

Veritas 

“ 6 

2 32 

& 5 

<5 D 9 9 .ris 2 40 Q, 

14 

6 

26 

5 34 

30 

Tuesday 

13 

Coloman 

“ 8 

3 59 

& 19 

D per. $ gr. dis. east 

14 

6 27 

5 33 

O . 

Wednesday 

14 

Fortunata 

1 Cor. 16 

5 8 

sh 2 

$ sets 6 40 

14 

6 

28 

5 32 

2 

Thursday 

15 

Hedwig 

Judges 13 

sets. 

A 15 

J^15, 7 * rL 6 50 

14 

6 

29 

5 31 

3 

Friday 

16 

Gallus 

“ 14 

6 20 

A 28 

’lpjy Formal s. 9 24 

14 

6 

31 

5 29 

4 

Saturday 

17 

Florentina 

“ 16 

6 57 

<«£ ii 

6 D 5 5 gr fiel.1. so. 

15 

6 

32 

5 28 

5 


42] 19 th Sunday aft. Trinity. Gosp. Matth. 9, 1-8. Ep. Eph. 4, 22-28. Days length 10 hours 54 min. 


Sunday 

18 

St. Luke Ev. 

2 Tim. 4 

7 34 

m 28 

<$ D \ h sets 7 22 

15 

6 33 

5 27 

6 

Monday 

19 

Ptolomy 

Dan. 3 

8 11 


$ rises 2 50 

15 

6 35 

5 25 

7 

Tuesday 

20 

Felicianus 

Judges 16 

8 53 

% 17 

% rises 11 56 

15 

6 36 

5 24 

8 

Wednesday 

21 

Ursula 

Ruth 2 

9 37 

# 29 

JJ. south 10 52 ^ 

15 

6 37 

5 23 

9 

Thursday 

22 

Cordula 

“ 3 

10 26 

^ 11 

^^iSir. ris. 11 50 

15 

6 38 

5 22 

10 

Friday 

23 

Severinus 

“ 4 

11 21 

*£21 

J023. O ent Sfg 

16 

6 40 

5 20 

11 

Saturday 

24 

Salome 

1 Sam. 4 

morn. 

A 5 

$ sets 6 36 

16 

6 41 

5 19 

12 


43] 20^A Sunday aft. Trinity. Gosp. Matth. 22,1-14. Ep. Eph. 5,15-21. Day's length 10 hours 36 min. 


Sunday 

25 

Crispin 

1 Sam 5 

12 15 

17;i D in apo. $ station. 

16 

6 42 

5 18 

13 

Monday 

26 

Amandus 

* 6 

1 10 

A 29 

9 rises 3 1 

16 

6 44 

5 16 

14 

Tuesday 

27 

Sabina 

“ 7 

2 10 

3K 12 

iRigel rises 9 28 

16 

6 45 

5 15 

15 

Wednesday 

28 

Simon Jud. 

John 15, 17 ff. 

3 12 

25 

j 6 D % % south 10 20 

16 

6 46 

5 14 

16 

Thursday 

29 

Zwinglius f 

1 Sam. 8 

4 18 

flF 8 

| % rises 11 48 

1616 47 

5 13 

17 

Friday 

30 

Serapion 

“ 9 

5 20 

22 

h se ts 6 33 

16 6 48 

5 12 

18 

Saturday 

31 

Reformation 

John 2, 13-17 

rises 

PS? 7 

j '|4?y31. Or. ri 9 0 

1616 50 

5 10 

19 


% Jupiter is on the 1st in Opposition to the Sun, and shines the whole night. 


---!-— 

MOON’S PHASES. 


, Full Moon, 1st day 3 o’clock 8 

min. 

Afternoon. 

}■ Last Quarter, 9th “ 

1 “ 

27 

u 

Morning. 

j New Moon, 15th “ 

6 “ 

15 

u 

Evening. 

First Quarter. 23rd “ 

4 “ 

68 

ti 

Morning. 

Full Moon, 31st “ 

6 “ 

21 

t( 

Mornkig. 


HISTORICAL REMINISCENCES.— January. 
Three great events occurred during this month. 
America was discovered on the 12th, 1492; the great 
decisive battle of Leipzig was fought on the 18th, 
1813; and Luther commenced the great Reformation 
in good earnest on the 31st, 1517. 


n a 







































































































OCTOBER. 



AIHT I NICE? 

Xs that intended for a boy or a girl ? The Almanac 
man likes to see boys and girls nicely dressed, if their 
parents can afford it; but he don’t like to see the 
foolish fashions which nowadays mix up the garments 
of boys and girls. 

SUNDAY VISITING. 

lou must keep God’s day holy; but you cannot do 
it if you spend it in social visiting. This is a much 
greater sin than people generally think. See how 
many wrongs it brings: 

1. You wrong yourself. 

2. You wrong those whom you visit, because they 
cannot keep the day as they should. 

3. You wrong the beast that takes you there, be¬ 
cause he cannot get his rest. 

4. You wrong all who see and hear of your Sun¬ 
day visiting, by the bad example you give them. 

5. Especially do you wrong your children, by 
breaking the very commandment you should careful¬ 
ly teach them to keep. 

Oh how strange that Christians should be guilty 
of this great sin! Why, dearly beloved, if you do 
net keep God’s day holy by h f ly deeds, who will ? 


YE ARE WITHOUT EXCUSE. 

Oh how wickedly men excuse themselves from 
doing their duty! How sinfully they justify them¬ 
selves in neglecting plain commandments! 

You were up too late for prayer meeting; every 
week-day you are up much earlier for your labor! 

It was too cold, or wet, or warm to go to Sunday 
School; very strange the weather does not keep you 
at home during the week 1 

You were too unwell to be at church; you seldom 
are too unwell to be in the shop, store, or field ! You 
were there on Saturday and ou Monday! 

You had not time to see that your child had his 
Sunday School and Catechetical lesson; but, my 
dear friend, did you spend your time in any thing 
more important than your child’s religious instruc¬ 
tion ? 

You are not able to take the church paper; but 
you seem able to take a county paper and a fashion 
Magazine! That seems odd! Arc they of more 
account, especially for your children ? 

You forgot to speak to your son about confirma¬ 
tion next communion; you must have been deefdy 
interested in his soul! 

You had to visit the sick last Sunday morning; 
why did you not go to church, and visit the sick in 
the afternoon or Monday morning? 

The simple truth about these excuses and justifi¬ 
cations is this: they generally are sinful and shamo- 
ful, showing a lack of earnestness in the Christian 
life. You can tell them to your pastor or neighbor, 
but you will not in judgment tell them to the Lord. 
Ye are without excuse. Treat your soul as care¬ 
fully as you treat your body, and you will not need 
one-tenth the number of excuses, because your duties 
will be done. 


TO THE COOKS. 

When the minister visits you, please do not always 
give him fried ham and eggs, roast beef, chickens 
turkeys, custards, and sweet cakes. It is a cruel 
practice; but the minister does not like to say airy 
thing to those, who so kindly entertain him. 

In the winter* give him for a change, a bowl of 
mush and milk, and corn cakes; and in the summer, 
lots of vegetables and soup, beef soup, rice soup, 
potato soup, noodle soup, and things of that sort. Do 
not make a stranger of him, but give him oftener of 
such things as the family eats every day. The cooks 
will please take notice. 


23 











NOVEMBER, 


11 tb Month, SO Days. 


1868. 


Weeks and 
Days. 

Remarkable days.j 

1 

Daily Bible 

Lessons 

i 

Moon 
R.&S. 
h m 

Moon’s 

Place. 

I 

Miscellaneous Particu¬ 
lars. 

s. 

ft. 

SUN 

rises 
; h in 

SUN 

sets, 
h m 

c 

5T 

44] 21s£ Sunday aft. Trinity. 

Gosp. John4,47-54. 

Ep. Epb. 6,10-17. Day’s length 10 hrs. 18 min. 

Sunday 

1 

All Saints. 

'Matth. 5, 1-12 

6 28 

SO? 21! 

| 9 rises 3 12 w 

16 

6 51 

5 9 

20 

Monday 

2 

All Souls 

1 Sam. 20 

716 

M 6 

1 b sets 6 22 

16 

6 52 

5 8 

21 

Tuesday 

3 

Theophilus 

Luke 1, 1-4 

8 9 

21';Orion rises 8 47 

16 

6 53 

5 7 

23 

Wednesday 

4 

Charlotte 

1 Sam. 21 

9 7 

H§g OijSirius ris. 10 59 ^ 

16.6 54 

5 6 

23 

Thursday 

5 

Malaehi 

“ 31 

10 12 

21 : 6 5 0 infer. 6 D # 

16 6 55 

5 5 

24 

Friday 

6 

Leonard 

2 Sam. 12 

11 16 


' /St*' 21 south 9 44 

15 

6 56 

5 4 

25 

Saturday 

7 

Engelbert 

“ 15 

morn. 

QL 

S# ISi;^ 7th. fc.rlll 40 

16 

6 67 

5 8 

66 


45] 2 ‘M Sunday aft. Trinity. Gosp. Matth. 18,28-35. Ep. Phil. 1, 3-11. Days length 10 hrs. 4 min. 

Sunday 
Monday 


Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Thursday 
Friday 
Saturday 


8 

Cecilia 

2 Sam. 18 

[12 22 

9 

Theodore 

“ 19 

1 24 

10 

Mar. Luther 

Heb. 13 

2 28 

11 

M. Chemnitz 

Joel 3 

3 34 

12 

Jonas 

Jonah 1 

4 34 

13 

Wincbert 

u 2 

5 32 

14 

Levin 

“ 2 

sets. 



Q Rigel ris. 8 41 
D per. 7* so. 12 42 
2J. south 9 26 
6 D 9 9 rises 8 29 
6 J) % $ rises 5 49 
□ SO $ stat. 
14 Sri. 11 33 


1616 58 

5 2 

27 

16 6 59 

5 1 

28 

16|7 1 

4 59 

29 

16 7 2 

4 58 

30 

167 3 

4 57 

31 

157 4 

4 56 

M 

15 7 5 

4 55 

2 


46] 23 d Sunday aft. Trinity. Gosp. Matth. 22,15-22. Ep. Phil. 3, 17-21. Day’s length 9 hrs. 48 m. 

feunday : 

Monday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Thursday 
Friday 
Saturday 


15 

Leopold 

1 Jonah 4 

6 

121^ 1 

6 D h 9 in perihel. 

15 

7 

6 

4 54 

3 

16 

Ottomar 

!l Kings 1 

6 

51 13 

2J. in perihelion 

15 

7 

7 

4 53 

4 

17 

Alpheus 

Mark 3 

7 

33 26 

9 rises 3 42 w 

15 

7 

8 

4 52 

5 

18 

Gelasius 

1 Kings 2 

8 

2l|^ 8 

Spica rises 4 17 

15 

7 

9 

4 51 

6 

19 

Elizabeth 

Luke 1 

9 

12!^ 19 

21 south 8 40 

14 

7 

10 

4 50 

7 

20 

Amos 

Ainas 5 

10 

4j 4, 1 

5 gr. llel. 1. no. 

14 

7 4r 

4 49 

8 

21 

Off. V. Ma ry 

jLevit. 5 

10 50| Jfg 19 

3) apo. 5 £T- di. west 

14 

7 

H 

4 49 

9 


47] 24tli Sunday aft. Trinity. Gosp.Matth. 9,18-26. Ep Col. 1, 9-14. Day's length 9 hours 36 min. 
Sunday - 


Monday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday I 
Thursday 
Friday 

Saturday _ 

48] ls£ Sunday in Advent. Gosp. Matth 21 1-9. Ep. Rom. 13, 11-14. Day’s length 9 lirs. 24 m. 


22 

Alphonus 

Amos 9 

11 50 

22 ‘ © ent. 

1317 12 

4 48 

\m 

23 

Clement 

Phil: 4, 1-3 

morn. 

X 7H S ^/ "S rises 11 26 

1317 13 

4 47 

11 

24 

Chrisogenes 

1 Kings 8 

12 49 

20 6 J V 7- south 8 17 

13 

7 14 

4 46 

12 

25 

Catharine 

1 Kings 9 

1 48 

3; 9 rises 3 53 

13 

7 15 

4 45 

13 

26; 

Conrad 

“ 10 

2 49 

16 ;i 7* south 11 39 

12 

7 16 

4 44 

14 

27 

Josaphat 

2 Chron. 17 

3 56 

0j 'Orion rises 7 6 

12 

7 16 

4 44 

15 

28 

[Guntherus 

1 Kings 19 

5 4 

15| Sirius rises 9 28 

12 

7 17 

4 43 

16 


Sunday 

Monday 


29 

Saturn 

2 Kings 2 

rises. 

M 0 

29. % station. 

11 

7 

18 

4 42 

30 

St. Andrew 

Mark 1 

5 48 

W M. 

flj&y Arct. ris. 2 32 

11 

7 

18 

4 42 


17 

18 


Saturn (1$) is on the 29tli in conjunction with the Sun and cannot be seen. 


MOON’S PHASES, 

Last Quarter, 7th day, 9 o'clock 2 min. Morning. 

New Moon, 14th “ 6 u 10 “ Morning. 

First Quarter, 22d “ 2 “ G “ Morning. 

Full Moon, 29th “ 8 “ 11 u Evening, 


HISTORICAL REMINISCENCES.— November. 
Willibrod, an apostolic missionary among the aii- 
cient Germans, died the 7th, 739. 

Milton, the great poet, born the 15th, 1608. 
Clemens, Bishop of Rome, died 23d, 102. 

John Knox, the Scotch Reformer, died the 23th, 1572 

\ ILw odw .kfcw.'h vl r: vdf vforf visb ft* boil fan 






































































































NOVEMBER. 



CHILDREN OUT OP DOORS. 


The open air is the place for children. Do not 
house them, and make them like tender plants. Be 
not afraid that a little sun or a little wind will hurt 
them. Give them a chance to grow hardy and 
healthy. Let them romp their fill. In large towns, 
the children are greatly in want of play-grounds. In 
the country they have free scope, and there is the 
place to look for red cheeks and strong museles. 

HOME MISSIONS. 

The Board of Home Missions in 1867 had 70 sta¬ 
tions under their care. Over $14,000 were contri¬ 
buted to this object, and upwards of $12,000 for 
Church Extension. And yet there are new stations 
calling for help. Let the people not be weary in 
contributing to this good work. One hundred years 
ago the now large congregations in Pennsylvania 
and Maryland were assisted in the same way by the 
churches in the fatherland. Let us now do for the 
great West what, in our poor and feeble state, was 
done for us. Gratitude, as well as love to Christ and 
His kingdom, requires this at our hands. 

TALK TO Y0UE CHILDREN. 

Talk to your children. Ask a question or tell 
them something. Do not walk or work with them 
for hours with your mouth shut. 

Make them see and feel that every human being 
has a mind, and that this world is a place for think¬ 
ing as Well as eating, for learning as well as working. 

Interest them in what lies immediately around 
them. The earth and the air, the woods and the 
waters, each and all have lessons for them. 

Talk to your children about themselves, their 


plays, their tasks, their plans and notions. Set their 
mind to work, and give it right direction. 

Oh what an advantage all, this will be to them in 
the course of ten years! To have a silent father or 
mother is a sad thing. Talk to your children. 

MONTHLY SALAEY. 

Some charges have adopted the system of sub¬ 
scribing and paying the pastor’s salary monthly. In 
this way more can be raised, and it is easier done 
than by the old way. Then it is better for the 
minister too. He needs money almost every day, 
and if the salary is paid Only every three or six 
months, or at the end of the year, as is often the 
caso (sometimes it is not all paid up even then), the 
minister is often very much embarrassed. He needs 
money, and although he has faithfully earned it, he 
has it not. He ought to buy some things, but he 
has not the money, and some things that he has 
bought, he can’t pay for. To adopt the monthly 
system of raising the salary, is far the best : for pastor 
and people. Try it, and report to us, and if it does 
not work as we say, the Almanac-man will advocate 
the old plan next year. 

TEEASUEEES OF THE B0AEDS AND SYNODS. 

EASTERN SYNOD. 

Theological Seminary. —Adam B. Wingerd, 
Greencastle, Franklin Co., Pa. 

Board of Foreign Missions. —Rudolph F.Kel- 
ker, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Board of Domestic Missions.— Charles Santee, 
No. 239 North Third St., Phila., Pa. 

Church Extension Fund. —John Wiest, Box 
2754 P. O,, Phila., Pa. 

Board of Education. —Rev. Samuel R. Fisher, 
D.D., No. 54 North Sixth St., Phila., Pa. 

Board of Trustees of Franklin and Mar¬ 
shall College. —Jacob Bausman, Lancaster, Pa. 

Synod of Reformed Church in the United 
States;*—R. F. Kelker, Harrisburg, Pa. 

western synod. 

Theological Seminary. — Rev. D. Winters, 
Dayton, Ohio. 

Board of Domestic Missions.— A. H. Baugh¬ 
man, Xenia, Ohio. * 

Board of Foreign Missions. —[Same as East¬ 
ern Synod]. 

Synod of Ohio and Adjacent States.—R ev. 
I. H. Reiter, Miamisburg, Ohio. 

Heidelberg College. —N.L.Brewer, Tiffin,Ohio 

25 












DECEMBER, 12th Month, 31 Days 1868, 


Weeks and 
Days. 

Remarkable days. 

Daily Bible 
Lessons. 

Moon 

R.&S. 

h m 

Moon’s 
Place. 

Miscellaneous Par¬ 
ticulars. 

s. 

si. 

m 

SUN 

rises 

b m 

SUN 

sets, 
h m 

O 

» 

vT 

CO 

Tuesday 

1 

Longinus 

2 Kings 5 

6 46 

ms o 

9 rises 4 2 ps 

11 

7 19 

4 41 

19 

Wednesday 

2 

Candidus 

“ 6 

7 49 

15 

south 7 45 

10 

7 19 

4 41 

20 

Thursday 

3 

Cassianus 

“ 20 

8 54 

0 

Sirius rises 8 58 

10 

7 20 

4 40 

21 

Friday 

4 

Barbara 

1 Cbron. 16 

9 59 

n* 15 

D per. Alt se. 9 27 

9 

7 20 

4 40 

22 

Saturday 

5 

Abigail 

1 Sam. 25 

11 8 

S# 29 

% rises 11 18 £2 

9 

7 21 

4 39 

23 

49] 2d Sunday in Advent. Gosp. Luke. 21, 25-36. 

Ep. Roml5,4-13. Day's length 9 hours 18 min. 

Sunday 

6 

St. Nicholas 

Acts 6, 1-7 

morn. 

13; 

1/^6. Re. r. 10 24 

9|7 21 

4 39 

24 

Monday 

7 

Agathou 

Job 38 

12 16 

§= 26, 

9 gr. Hel. 1. no. 

8 7 22 

4 38 

25 

Tuesday 

8 

Cone. V. M. 

Isa. 7 

1 20 

sh 9: 

Orion rises 6 20 

817 22 

4 38 

26 

Wednesday 

9 

Joachim 

“ 32 

2 30 

sh 21 

Fomal sets 9 53 

7 

|7 23 

4 38 

27 

Thursday 

10 

Judith 

“ 37 

3 41 

Sjig 4 

6 j) 9 9 rises 4 18 

7j7 23 

4 37 

28 

Friday 

11 

Barsabas 

Ac to 15, 22 If. 

4 54 

« 16 

% south 7 9 

6 7 23 

4 37 

29 

Saturday 

12 

Attilia 

Isa. 38 

5 58 

mg 28 

J)6 $ h hr. 6 12 mo. 

6j7 24 

4 36 

.30 


50] 3d Sunday in Advent, Gosp. Matth. 11, 2-10. Ep. 1 Cor. 4, 1-5. Day's length 9 hours 12 min. 


Sunday 

13 

Lucian 

Isa. 39 

sets. 

# 10 

J|||13. 7*s. 10 17 

5 

7 24 

4 36 

D 

Monday 

14 

Nicasius 

“ 40 

5 

34 

Sr 22 

% rises 11 9 

5 

7 24 

4 36 

2 

Tuesday 

15 

Ignatius 

“ 41 

6 

24 

& 4 

Spica ris. 2 21 

4 

7 25 

4 35 

3 

Wednesday 

16 

End) erday- 

“ 42 

7 

16 

voS16 

Fomal sets 9 21 

4 

7 25 

4 85 

4 

Thursday 

17 

Lazarus 

John 11 

8 

13 

VO&28 

% south 6 45 

3 

7 25 

4 35 

5 

Friday 

18 

W unibald 

Jer. 23 

9 

10 

£4 10 

9 rises 4 36 

3 

7 25 

4 35 

6 

Saturday 

19 

Abraham 

Gen. 12 

10 

11 

iS 22 

£3 Regul. ris. 9 36 

2|7 25 

4 35 

7 


51] 4th Sunday in Advent. Gosp. John 1, 19-28. Ep. Phil. 4, 4-7. Day's length 9 hours 10 min. 


Sunday 

20 

Cath de Boraf 

Prov. 31 

11 12 

«5s> A 

h rises 5 44 

2 

7 25 

4 35 

8 

Monday 

21 

St. Thomas 

John 20, 24 ff. 

morn. 

3K 16 

^21.© M&JSh.d. 

1 

7 26 

4 34 

9 

Tuesday 

22 

Beata 

Hosea 6 

12 12 

^ 28 

Winter com , 

A 

7 25 

4 35' 

10 

Wednesday 

23 

Dagohert 

“ 13 

1 13 

11 

9 rises 4 49 

CO 

7 25 

4 35 

11 

Thursday 

24 

Adam, Eve 

Gen. 2 

2 19 

25 

% rises 10 58 

§ 

7 25 

4 35 

12 

Friday 

25 

Christmas 

Isa. 9, 2-7 

3 17 

PS? 8 

% sets 12 20 

% 

7 25 

4 35 

13 

Saturday 

26 

Stephen 

Luke 2, 1-20 

4 16 

23 

□ I/O Sir. ris. 7 16 

0 

7 25 

4 35 

14 

52] Sunday after Christmas. 

Gosp. Luke 2,33—40. 

Ep. Gal. 4, 1-7. Day's length 9 hours 10 min. 

Sunday 

27 

John , Evan. 

John 21, 20 ff. 

5 12 

ff 8 

Orion south 11 23 

1 

7 25 

4 35 

15 

Monday 

28 

H. Innocents 

Jer. 31 

6 6 

fit 23 

&9 ris. 4 50 ^ 

2 

7 25 

4 35 

16 

Tuesday 

29 

Noah 

Gen. 6 

rises. 

ttu® 8 

|^y29. 6 D $ 

2 

7 24 

4 36 

17 

Wednesday 

30 

David 

l Sam. 16 

6 18 

*BS 23 

h rises 5 17 

3 

7 24 

4 36 

18 

Thursday 

31 

Sylvestex 

Luke 12,35 40 

7 28j$$* 8 

]) in per. © in per. 

3 

7 24 

4 36 

19 


MOON’S PHASES. HISTORICAL REMINISCENCES.— August. 


Last Quarter, 6th day, 4 o’clock 42 min. Evening. 

New Moon, 13th “ 8 “ 38 “ Evening. 

First Quarter 21st “ 11 “ 29 “ Evening. 

Full Moon, 29th “ 8 ** 45 « Morning. 


George Whitfield one of the founders of the 
Methodist Church, was born the 15th 1714. 

Charles the Great, was crowned Emperor of Ger¬ 
many on the 25th, 800. 

Joiin Kepler, the great German Astronomer, waa 
born the 27th, 1511. 














































































































THE LIGHTHOUSE. 

Lighthouses are built along the coast that ships 
may have a guide and warning, and thus know what 
way to steer so as not to run into danger. Mariners 
are always on the look-out for their bright light at 
night. Some of them are one hundred and fifty feet 
high, built like a tower, so that the one who attends 
the light can go up and down. There are about five 
hundred of these structures along the coast of the 
United States—generally located on headlands, so as 
to be seen from far. The Government builds them, 
and keeps them in repair. The expense for light¬ 
houses in 1859, was nearly one million of dollars. 
How many things a good government must provide 
for! It even prepares guides for the ship captains 
and poor sailors on the dark and stormy sea. He 


who refleets on the many benefits citizens de¬ 
rive from the Government, will not murmur 
when called upon to pay his taxes. Christ him¬ 
self paid his tax, and the apostle tells us to pay 
.tribute to whom tribute is due The Church 
has also its lighthouses to guide us over the 
dark sea of this life into the heaven of endless 
rest. Let us always keep them in our eye. 


A HINT. 

It is often pleasant for pastor and people to 
have a neighboring minister assist at a Com¬ 
munion season. It is right that ministers 
should help each other at such times. When 
this is done, the expenses of the visiting minis¬ 
ter should be paid by the congregation who re¬ 
ceives his services. Some times this is neg¬ 
lected or forgotten A word to the Deacons 
will be suflicient,—for your pastor ought not to 
be expected or allowed himself to pay these 
travelling expenses. The preaching is for you, 
more than for your pastor. Lot the Deacons 
attend to this matter without being reminded 
of it by their pastor. 


MAKING AND SPENDING MONEY. 

It is difficult to tell at present which is the 
greater, the rage for making money, or the rage 
for spending it. How is it that these contra¬ 
dictory views go together? It is easily ex¬ 
plained. Those who spend money so freely are 
not the same as those who have made it. The 
fast young men and ladies whom you see scat¬ 
tering money so lavishly, never made any money 
themselves. They are only spending the savings 
of their fathers. The fathers, amid many cares and 
pains, have cursed their souls by miserly,worldliness, 
and now their children are cursiDg theirs by profli¬ 
gacy. What folly it is on the part of the parents to 
hoard up a vast pile only to afford a temporary fund 
for ill-trained and thriftless heirs to scatter it 
How many instances there are to prove, that those 
who commenced life with nothing have prospered, 
while those who inherited a goodly legacy have soon 
come to worse than nothing. Let Christians do good 
with their surplus money, and God will prosper 
their heirs more with a small start than with a large 
one. 


27 









ALMANAC FOR THE REFORMED CHURCH IN THE U. S, 


OLD AND NEW WISDOM. 

It is often insinuated, if not directly said, that the 
present generation is much wiser and better than 
the fathers of the generation past. In some parti¬ 
culars this may be true. But we venture to say 
that, for solid sense in regard to religious matters, 
they were not a whit behind us. In many respects 
what we are disposed to call thefr slow wisdom and 
piety, were decidedly better than many of our more 
modern religious schemes and devices. If we look 
carefully, it will be found that what we regard as 
their stubborn prejudices, were, in fact, earnest and 
sensible protests against error, and really a solid zeal 
for the preservation of precious truths. The Alma 
nac man now proceeds to give a few illustrations 

I. They were strongly opposed to what were 
called u night meetings .” For this they were loudly 
blamed. But let us examine this point. They had 
two reasons for their opposition to “night meet- 

ing 8 *” 

1. At that time these night meetings were con¬ 
ducted entirely by fanatical sects, and were generally 
scenes of wild disorder. They looked upon them as 
traps and snares laid in darkness, wherewith to catch 
their young people, and draw them away from the 
Church. They saw, too, that little good, but gene¬ 
rally much evil resulted from those excitements. 
They believed, that the sentimental hymns and rol¬ 
licking choruses, together with frantic appeals to 
fears and feelings, tended to blunt and abuse the re¬ 
ligious instincts of the young, and thus to do a last¬ 
ing injury to the religious natures of young baptized 
members of the Church. Were they not right'/ 
They certainly were. 

2. They saw, or felt at least, that the entire theory 
of religion underlying these wild “night meetings,’^ 
was fundamentally at war with the churohly idea and 
practice. They saw, that it ignored baptismal grace, 
and did not at all recognize the perpetual virtue of 
the covenant, in which baptized children stand. 
Hence they saw, that it was at war with the cateche¬ 
tical and educational idea of Christianity. That 
they were right in this, has been abundantly illus¬ 
trated by experience. Wherever the churches fell 
into the anxious-bench system, the old, well tried 
catechetical system was set aside. The two systems 
are inconsistent with each other, and can never go 
together. This our fathers saw; and to their minds 
wild “ night meetings ” were the entering wedge for 
this bad system. Many who condemned them for 
what they regarded a stubborn prejudice, if not eten 


an evidence of entire lapk of piety, have since learned 
by experience and trial of the other system, that they 
were profoundly right. 

II. At first the fathers of the past generation did 
not fall in with the establishment of “Sunday- 
schools.” This was looked upon as downright hea¬ 
thenism, or at least an evidence of religious ignorance 
and stupid opposition to the progress of vital Chris¬ 
tianity. How many a blazing itinerant sent them to 
perdition for this stubborn ungodliness before their 
time! 

Let us look for the ground of this want of confi¬ 
dence in the new institution. Our fathers knew of 
he existence of an order in the Church, which they 
thought even better than Sunday-schools. It was 
the venerable custom of Sunday afternoon catechising, 
a service which was attended by parents and chil¬ 
dren, and which was conducted by the pastor him¬ 
self. He heard them repeat the catechism, he ex¬ 
plained it in simple language for the children, he 
drew practical lessons from its doctrines, and he sung 
and prayed with the children. This our fathers 
regarded as good as a Sunday-school. Perhaps they 
were right. Who does not know, that many teachers 
in our Sunday-schools are not capable of rightly in¬ 
structing children. They have not the time to pre¬ 
pare for it, and have certainly not the qualifications 
of the pastor. If the pastor has them all in one 
class, why may he not instruct them at least as well 
as can be done in Sunday-schools. If Sunday-schools 
do much good, why might not Sunday afternoon 
catechising by the pastor accomplish equally as much. 
It is true, that on account of the fact that our pastor 
had fo serve six and eight congregations when the 
country was new and the people scattered over thinly 
populated territory, the pastor found it difficult to 
keep up this good custom, and it therefore went out 
of use in a great degree. Yet our fathers remem¬ 
bered it, knew that it belonged to the true order of 
God’s house, and therefore thought it would be wiser 
to restore the good old order than to introduce a new 
and untried scheme. Who will say that even now a 
Sunday afternoon catechetical service with the chil¬ 
dren, attended by the parents also, and conducted by 
the pastor, would not accomplish as much as a ses¬ 
sion of the Sunday-school ? This is certainly a 
question; and many are seriously discussing it in 
their own minds. For one, we firmly believe that 
less than a score of years will restore to many of our 
congregations the Sunday afternoon catechetical ser¬ 
vice. Then it would appear that in regard to thi# 





ALMANAC FOR THE REFORMED CHURCH IN THE U, S. 


point our fathers were not as stupid as many took 
them to be. 

What is still more significant, our fathers knew 
that in the Sunday afternoon catechetical service, 
the children were indoctrinated in the teachings of 
the catechism; and they feared that the Sunday- 
school would gradually take the catechism away from 
them. Was this fear well founded? Has the new 
order of things tended to promote thoroughness in 
the knowledge of the catechism? Who will say that 
it has? In many Sunday-schools the catechism is 
not used at all. True, there is an effort in some 
quarters to restore its use. But the measure is not 
popular, and many teachers are opposed to it, while 
even superintendents think that it interferes with 
the interests of the school. Why should it? Is it 
not surely because few teachers are able to put the 
interest into the catechetical service, which a pastor 
can; and it is found that a more free, general, and 
superficial mode of instruction presents more novelty 
and passing interest. Hence there is an increasing 
tendency to make the teaching desultory and system¬ 
less. This is the same as to say that it tends to be¬ 
come more and more inefficient for the true ends of 
religious motive and solid Christian intsruetion. 

The inadequacy of this kind of instruction is widely 
felt. Many realize that there is something wrong. 
The subject of needed improvement in Sunday-school 
instruction is being earnestly discussed in our 
church-papers, and large conventions have been held, 
to counsel over it, and to ascertain, if possible, how 4 
tke evil is to be remedied. These are sinip’y stub¬ 
born facts. 

What if the days and earnest feeling of our fathers 
on this subject, should yet turn out to be right in¬ 
stead of wrong? What if what was regarded as their 
folly, should yet prove to be true wisdom? What if 
time, and earnest inquiry should yet convince the 
Church, that the only way of remedying the acknow¬ 
ledged inefficiency of our Sunday-schools, is to turn 
them into Sunday afternoon catechetical services, 
under the care and conduct of the pastor, after the 
prevailing fashion of the olden time? We are not 
now deciding that it ought to he so. We are only 
asking questions. We hope these questions may 
call forth reflection, and finally bring satisfactory 
answers. We are not aiming to show that our Sun¬ 
day-schools do or do not meet the full needs of the 
Church; we are only trying to prove that our fathers 
were not as stupid, stubborn, foolish, and impious as 
many are disposed to regard them. Old wisdom is 


sometimes as good as new. Sometimes it is even 
better. So, at least, thinks the Almanac man. 

III. Our forefathers are supposed to have been 
opposed to education. Their reluctance to fall in 
with the Common School System especially, was re¬ 
garded as positive proof that they undervalued, if 
they did not even hate learning. They had also pro¬ 
verbs which* are said to indicate the same thing. 
For instance: u Je gelehrter , je verkehrter,” —the 
more learned, the more perverted. Also “ Schulen 
machen schelmen” schools make rogues. Were they 
then not opposed to education ? The Almanac mau 
proposes to inquire a little into this matter. 

There never was a people, where there was greater 
respect for, and deference toward educated men 
They loved to speak of the learning of their pastors; 
and toward learned lawyers and physicians among 
them, they entertained the highest respect. They 
placed their school houses always beside their 
church, and the schoolmaster was the next man to 
the minister, in their estimation. These are facts. 

How, then, did they oppose education? They 
opposed a certain kind of education . That is all. 
They opposed that kind of education which divorces 
it from religion. Of this kind of education they 
were convinced, that it was not only useless, but that 
it was positively evil. They saw that education is 
only good when it has its basis in grace, and that 
“ educated nature is educated vice.” When there is 
no grace in education, then it is true, as they said 
“the more learned, the more perverted;” aud they 
were perfectly right in saying that such “schools 
make rogues.” 

Their opposition to the Common Schools rested on 
precisely this ground. They saw already that this 
system would do just what it has done. This namely, 
that it would take the school-house away from the 
church, and instead of keeping the schoolmaster, who, 

' in the church, stands by the side of the pastor, it 
would bring in schoolmasters from abroad, from the 
world—such as would regard Christian teaching 
none of their business. They saw that when the 
Church would thus lose its school-houses and school¬ 
masters it would also lose its catechism, its hymn- 
book, its prayers in school, and with them every kind 
of Christian life in the school. This they foresaw. 
And has it not all come to pass ? 

It was not schools that they were opposed to, but 
a certain kind of schools; not schoolmasters, for they 
always had and loved them, but a certain of 

schoolmasters; not education, but a certain kind of 

29 



ALMANAC FOR THE REFORMED CHURCH IN THE U. S. 


- education. What if the crops of infidels trained in 
Christless schools should soon become so formidable, 
that men will be glad to seek again after that very 
system of Christian education which they have cast 
away, as the stupid folly of our forefathers? 

Thus have we sought to show, that what are com¬ 
monly regarded as the stupid follies of our forefath¬ 
ers, were not so stupid alter all. They stood firm 
for the defence of precious, underlying truth. Time 
will still more fully and clearly show, that there was 
more truth in their position, than in that of those 
who undertook to reform them. What is old is not 
just for that reason itself necessarily bad. The Al¬ 
manac man thinks, that it is time for us to speak and 
to think with a little more modesty and humility, of 
the wisdom which those relied on, who have gone be¬ 
fore us. 


ABE BAPTIZED CHILDBED MEMBEKS? 

Our new pastor called on Mr. Blank to ask about 
his family. “ How many children have you ?” 

“ Four, sir; but only two of them are members of 
the Church.” 

“ Perhaps you mean, Mr. Blank, that only two of 
them are confirmed or full members of the Church ?” 

“ Yes, sir, that’s it. They joined the Church 
Easter before last.” 

“ Indeed, Mr. Blank, I’m sorry,” said the new 
pastor, “ but there must be some mistake here. You 
first said that the two youngest are not yet members 
of the Church; and you just now said the other two 
joined the Church Easter before last.” 

“So I said.” 

“ Now look at this matter. Of course you teach 
them the Heidelberg Catechism?” 

“ Pretty regularly. They also study it in our 
Sunday School.” 

“Very well. Do you not recollect, that the first 
question and answer teach the child, that he already 
is a Christian, because he belongs to his faithful Sa¬ 
viour? and that the Holy Ghost already assures him 
of eternal life ? 

“ Do you not recollect, that in the twenty-sixth 
answer your child is taught, that God is His Father 
in and through Christ, which could not be unless 
your child were in the family of God. the Church ?” 

“ Is he not asked in the thirty-second question : 

‘ Why art thou called a Christian V And you know 
there would be no meaning in asking him such a 
question, unless the Catechism meant to teach him 
30 


that he is one? And, besides, he coutd not be one 
without being a member of the Church. 

“Above all, my dear friend, does not the fifty- 
fourth answer directly and positively call your child 
a ' living member , of the Church of Christ ? 

“ Then again, does not the seventy-fourth answer 
say, that by baptism your child has been admitted 
into the Christian Church ?” 

“ Indeed, Pastor, I never thought of these things 
just in this way. I always thankfully had my chil¬ 
dren baptized, and prayed that they might in due 
time be anxious for confirmation; but I never just 
thought that they were members of the Church. I 
now see that they are members through their bap¬ 
tism, as the seventy-fourth answer says.” 

“You see, then, Mr. Blank, that your two oldest 
children did not ‘join 3 the Church in their confirma¬ 
tion, but that they only thereby became full mem¬ 
bers ?” 

“ I think I understand it now. They are in the 
Church as real members by baptism; and in confir¬ 
mation they only come to the full privileges and be¬ 
nefits of the Church.” 

“Yes, sir; just as they are citizens of the State 
while children; but only at twenty-one do they be¬ 
come full citizens.” 

Christian parents, think of this. If they are 
Christian children, treat them accordingly. Teach 
them this blessed doctrine—its meaning, its comfort, 
and its responsibility. 

# Dear children, if you are members of the Church, 
then you should live like members,—piously, grow¬ 
ing in grace and in knowledge, and preparing your¬ 
selves for confirmation. 

ci ».- T 4? -j aj ;i Jt ; try Ml. W ,1: ohIuh hi da iit> 


BEADING THE BIBLE THBOUGH. 

For many years John Quincy Adams was in the 
habit of reading the Bible through every year. He 
did it by reading four or five chapters every morn¬ 
ing, soon after rising. He thought it a good way to 
begin the day. 

He was a great man, and always had his hands 
and head full of important work; yet he found time 
to do this. 

Oh what a shame, then, for people who have so 
much less to do, and who trifle away so much time, 
to say they have no time to read the Bible regularly! 

If you read five chapters every Sunday, and three 
every week day, you will get through in a year 






ALMANAC FOR THE REFORMED CHURCH IN THE U.'& 


A SHORT FUNERAL SERMON. 

text : gen. xlyiii. 21. 

Jaoob, there called Israel, died in Egypt, far off 
from the blessed land of Canaan; but God would be 
with His children, and bring them safe to the land 
of their fathers. 

What a meaning this has for the Christian child! 
Your parents die, but God will be with you in this 
Egypt world, and finally bring you safe into the land 
of* your fathers, namely, Heaven ! 


THIRD BLAST OF THE TRUMPET. 

“The men and boys still stand outside the church, 
before service, instead of reverently going in.” 

Well, that is bad enough. It shows where their 
hearts are! 

There is only one way to cure them, namely, get 
the women and girls to sit around in the shade out¬ 
side, and to stand on the steps. They have the same 
right to do it, and it would not look worse than for 
the men to be outside. 

Try the cure, good women. 

GREAT FOLLY. 

What is great folly? To pay your pastor for 
peaching, and then to do as you please about what 
he preaches. 

When you pay a lawyer for advice, you generally 
follow it. When you call in the doctor, you generally 
do as he directs. Why not act as wisely with the 
man who teaches you how to live ? 

To be a hearer of the word, but not a doer, is to 
deceive yourself. 

UNION CHURCHES. 

“In old times,” it was the rule among the Re¬ 
formed and Lutherans, to build union churches. 
The reasons were then right good. The country 
was thinly settled, the people generally poor, and 
service could be held only every four or eight weeks. 
The reasons in favor of union churches now, are 
generally so weak, that it needs no learning to answer 
them. Everybody acknowledges, that it is far better 
for each denomination to have their own churches. 

The only argument that we hear in favor of union 
churches is, “We are too poor to build ourselves.” 
In nineteen cases out of twenty, the facts are differ - 
ent. Who are the persons that use this argument? 
Why, in almost every case, they are men who love 
their money more than they love God: who care 


more for the world than for the prosperity of the 
Church. It is time to stop this union business. It 
does no good. A simple outward union is of no real 
benefit: on the contrary, it does harm, as it has often 
done. It is like trying to mix oil and water. It is 
difficult for two housekeepers, even if they are sisters, 
to cook at the same fire and preserve peace. 


WEATHER SIGHS. 
Evening red and morning grey 
Will set the traveller on his way 
Evening grey and morning red, 
Pours rain upon the traveller’s head. 


WANT OF MINISTERS. 

It seems at first thought a singular fact, that while 
our ministry has increased in numbers during the 
last thirty years more than in a whole century before, 
there is as great, yea, even a greater scarcity of min¬ 
isters. There are at present at least fifty needed. 
This is not an evidence of slow growth, but just the 
opposite. The Church has made greater progress in 
the last quarter of a century than in a whole century 
previous. With the growth of the Church, the need 
of ministers keeps pace. The great need of ministers 
is owing to the following facts. 

1. Emigration is large, and new congregations are 
constantly being organized among foreign Germans. 

2 Our Pennsylvania German people, who are 
mostly farmers, remove into the Western States, 
where they can procure more land for less money, 
and thus provide homes for their children. Among 
them, new congregations grow up in all parts of the 
West. These need pastors. 

3. The large overgrown charges in the East, are 
fast being divided. Thus some charges of six and 
eight congregations, once served by one man, find it 
to their spiritual advantage to divide into two or 
three pastoral charges. This necessary division of 
large fields is constantly going on. It ought to go on 
faster than it does, and would, if the pastors to take 
charge could be procured. There are many large 
congregations in Eastern Pennsylvania, which are 
now attached to half a dozen others in a charge, but 
which could and would support a pastor alone, if the 
division could be effected and the pastor procured. 
There is a great and crying need of the reduction of 
these overgrow n charges. Only let young men come 
forward and give themselves to the great work of the 
holy ministry, and the good work can go forward. 









ALMANAC FOR THE REFORMED CHURCH IN THE U. S, 


WORLDLINESS, 

Go into our cities. What a rush for making 
money. The honest German was not far wrong, 
when, after having visited one of our cities, he was 
asked on his return how he liked it. and what was 
going on there, he replied, “O the beobles runs 
about dere just all the dime and cheats one another, 
and dey calls dat doing business.” 


AN AMENDMENT PROPOSED. 

We translate from the Pennsylvania German the 
following action, prepared in that dialect, for perspe- 
euity’s and pcintedness sake, by one of our country 
parsons, for adoption at the next regular meeting of 
one of his congregations. 

Whereas , Some of our members light (stecke ah), 
their pipes and smoke in church immediately after 
the benediction, which is sadly in conflict with a true 
sense of propriety; and further, 

Whereas , The smoking of tobacco, however glo¬ 
rious the results that have grown out of momentous 
projects thoroughly smoked over in political council 
may be, and to whatever advantage in unlnitting 
stubborn knots it may have been gone through with 
in ecclesiastical committee meetings, has yet never 
been regarded, either in the Christian, Jewish, 
Mohammedan or Pagan Religion, as itself an act of 
worship into which it might easily be construed here, 
on account of its juxtaposition with the divine ser¬ 
vices going immediately before; and again, 

Whereas, Some of the pipes when in smoking po¬ 
sition, and the ascension of the bluish-gray coils of 
smoke, bear too striking a resemblance to smoking 
altars and burning of incense to be free from a ju- 
daizing tendency; and once more, 

Whereas , Those who indulge in this delicacy at 
this exceedingly inappropriate time and place, fur¬ 
nish, though unconsciously perhaps, the occasion of 
a sore temptation to others, the human pastor not 
excepted, to commit the same act of impropriety, at 
least in their hearts; and lastly, 

Whereas , The pastor’s proposal privately made to 
some of the most prominent members, to serve them 
for the same amount that the congregation yearly 
spends for tobacco, has after due consideration, beea 
declined; because, first, their soil and climate had no 
aptitude for the growth of the plant, and the duty 
on tobacco was so provokingly high; and secondly, 
because preaching and spiritud p stare had remained 
comparatively cheap; therefore, 


Resolved , First, that lighting the pipe and smok¬ 
ing before leaving the church, except in cases of 
sickness, be and hereby is declared Un-German- 
Reforjned. 

Resolved , Again, that every member of this con¬ 
gregation be strongly urged seriously to study and 
earnestly to try to realize a profound sense of the 
3 art ling meaning of Hab. ii. 20, in which the pastor 
promises his aid by preaching a stirring sermon to 
the utmost of his ability on the passage. 

Resolved, Thirdly, that, our constitution be amended 
so as to forbid a bladder with tobacco (duwaeks 
Rlosz), a pipe and matches, or a flint (fire Steh), a 
steel and punk, to be brought into the church; and 
further, that the constitution be so far suspended as 
to allow the passage of this amendment by a majority 
instead of a two third vote, and that the ladies be 
required to vote, except some of the grand-mothers, 
whom we kindly excuse from the task, on account 
feebleness of age. 

Resolved , still further, That we recommend to those 
who enjoy the luxury in a more inside, but less po¬ 
lite form in church, to take the subject home under 
severe consideration. 

Resolved , in conclusion, That by the above action 
we do not at all, mean, that there is not a time to 
smoke; only there is a time not to smoke. 

Resolved , finally, That when we adjourn, we ad¬ 
journ to meet again, and that we come without our 
smoking apparatus, or tobacco in any form. 

Respectfully offered for consideration. We pro¬ 
mise to report the result of the action on the above 
in the next Almanac, together with a list of the yea# 
and nays, which will no doubt, be called for when 
the vote is taken. 


GRATITUDE. 

Gratitude which always acknowledges some good 
thankfully received and manifests itself in reciprocal 
acts of kindness and mercy, is a glorious privilege, 
as well as duty. Our heart’s warmest, feelings of 
gratitude should always be to God, the bountiful Giver 
of every good and perfect gift. It is hard to see how 
any one can sit down to his laden table and enjoy 
all the luxuries that the appetite can crave, without 
giving God thanks; yet many, alas, even members 
of the Chureh do it. 

It takes away no slight degree of the Pastor’s re¬ 
lish of the meal when, in any of the families under 
his pastoral care, while asking tfc blessing, the awk- 







ALMANAC FOR THE REFORMED CHURCH IN THE U. S. 


ward fidget of the parents, the bewildered gaze of 
the boys and girls, and the children’s rattling with 
their tin plates and little spoons, and their grasping 
at and impatiently asking, in some outlandish tongue, 
for a favorite dish, in spite of the mother’s serious, 
beblushed face, emphatic shaking of h ir head and 
whispered remonstrances, betray to him that the 
giving of thanks at the table, is an innovation in 
that family. Then every dish appears to him to 
have not quite salt enough, and there is a painful 
sense of something wrong choking him. It is a 
grievous sin of omission not to preface every meal 
with thanksgiving, and the invocation of a blessing 
upon the food. 

He who is not susceptible to the daily pulsations 
of gratitude—“Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and 
spoils. 

The motions of his spirit are dull as night, 

And his affections dark as Erebus: 

Let no such man be trusted.” 

We all acknowledge the duty of perpetual grati¬ 
tude ; but let us never dare to forget that God re¬ 
quires always some of our thanks to be absolutely 
in cash —or if we have no money, its equivalent in 
faithful, devoted labor, in His vineyard. 


THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES. 

EASTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, lo¬ 
cated at Mercersburg, Pa. The Professors are: 

Rev. H. Harbaugh , D.D., Professor of Systematic 
History and Practical Theology. 

Rev. E. E. Higbee, D.D., Professor of Church 
History and Biblical Literature. 

J. B. Kerscbner , A.M. , Tutor. 

The full course in the Seminary is three years. 
The Seminary Year includes one Session, from the 
first Wednesday in September to the Wednesday 
after the second Sunday in May, with one vacation 
intervening. There is a recess of two weeks at 
Christmas. 

The number of students in the year 1866-67 was 
nineteen. 


WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 
located at Tiffin, Ohio. The Professors are: 

Rev. Moses Kieffer , Professor of Systematic 

and Practical Theology. 

Rev. Herman Rust , A.M., German Theological 

Professor. 


MISSION HOUSE, located at Howard Grove, 
near Sheboygan, Wisconsin. The teachers are: 

Rev. Dr. J. Bossard, Rev. H. Muhlmeier , Rev. J. 
T. Kluge. Its object is to prepare laborers for the 
missionary field. 


A MODEL MERCHANT. 

A merchant of New York, during the late war, 
made a contract with a mechanic to supply him with 
a quantity of tin cans. Not long after this the price 
of tin rose so much that the contractor must lose 
money by completing the work at the price agreed 
upon. However, he said nothing, but went on de¬ 
livering the cans. When the first bill for part of 
the cans was received, the employer called upon him. 
and said: 

“ I understand you are losing money on this job.” 

*• Yes,” replied the contractor, “ but I can stand 
it; a contract is a contract, you know.” 

“ How much will you lose?” asked the gentleman. 

“ 0, no matter,” was the reply, “ I don’t complain* 
and you ought not to.” 

“ I insist on knowing.” 

“ Well, since you desire it, I shall lose so much a 
hundred,” naming the amount. 

“ Well, sir,” said the noble hearted man, “you 
must not lose this, it would not be right; I shall add 
the amount to your bill, and as the price of material 
may still rise, I will advance you the money for the 
whole of the contract, which no doubt you can now 
use to advantage.” * 

The difference thus paid, to which the contractor 
laid no claim, amounted to five hundred dollars. 
That was something more than business honesty ; it 
was Christian principle carried out in business. The 
world needs just such examples to convince it of the 
truth of religion. 


INFLUENCE. 

A man in a blouse once said, “ I have no more in¬ 
fluence than a farthing rushlight.” “Well,” was 
the reply, “a farthing rushlight can do a good deal; 
it can set a hay-stack on fire; it can burn down a 
house; yea, more, it will enable a poor creature to 
read a chapter in God’s book. Go your way, friend, 
let your farthing rushlight so shine before men that 
others, seeing your good works, may glorify your 
Father which is in heaven.” 

33 







ALMANAC FOR THE REFORMED CHURCH IN THE U. S. 


LITERARY INSTITUTIONS. 
FRANKLIN AND MARSHALL COLLEGE, 
located at Lancaster, Pa. Fifty-nine students in 
the college proper, with eighteen in the Preparatory 
Department. 

FACULTY. 

Rev. John W. Nevin , D.D., President, and Pro¬ 
fessor of the Philosophy of History and Esthetics. 

Rev. E. V. Gerhart , D.D. , Vice President, and 
Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy. 

W. M. Nevin , Esq., A M. , Professor of Ancient 
Languages and Belles-Letters. 

—-Professor of Natural 

Science. 

Rev. Theodore Appel , A.M., Professor of Mathe¬ 
matics and Mechanical Philosophy. 

—r--, Professor of the Ger¬ 

man Language and Literature. 

John L. Atlee , M.D. , Professor of Anatomy and 
Physiology. 

The college year is divided into three terms. First 
term begins Sept. 12th. Second term begins Jan. 
:2d. Third term begins May 2d. July 25th is the 
<day of Commencement. 

Expenses. —Tuition, $39 per year. Contingent 
< expenses, $3 per Term. Boarding and room rent, at 
: the rate of $3 to $4 per week. Washing, $1 per 
month. The course of study is full and thorough. 
For particulars, send for a Catalogue. 


■HEIDELBERG COLLEGE located at Tiffin, 
( Ohio. 

FACULTX. 

Rev. George W. Williard, D.D., President, and 
i Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy. 

Rev . J. H. Good , A M. , Professor of Mathematics. 

Rev. Reuben Good , A.M., Professor of Natural 
Science, and Rector of the Preparatory Department. 

-, Professor of Languages. 

Joseph A. Keller , A.B., Tutor. 

The Winter Session begins Nov. 20th; the Spring 
^Session, April 1st. Number of students in the Clas¬ 
sical Department, 64; in the English course, 114. 

WESTMORELAND COLLEGE, located at 
Mount Pleasant, Westmoreland Co., Pa. 

Rev. F. K. Levan , A.M. , President. 

Rev. J. A. Peters , A.M., Professor of Languages. 

Two female Assistants. 


PALATINATE COLLEGE, located at Meyers- 
town, Lebanon Co., Pa. Chartered and organized m 
1867. A fine building is in course of erection. 

Rev. H. R. Nicks, President, with Assistants. 

MERCERSBURG COLLEGE, chartered 1865, 
located at Mercersburg, Pa. 

Rev. Thos. G. Apple , A.M, President. 

John Kieffer , A.M. , Professor of Ancient Lan¬ 
guages. 

Christian Kessler , Teacher of German. 

Miss Annie Beall , Teacher in English Branches. 

Miss Marietta Kershner , Teacher of Instrumental 
Music. 

Miss Bessie Simpson , Assistant Teacher. 

This institution, at present, takes students to the 
end of the Sophomore year. The present Freshman 
class numbers 12. Whole number of students, 131. 
There are two sessions in the year. Expenses, $100 
per session, which covers everything except instru¬ 
mental music; and there are no extra charges. The 
sessions extend from the middle of August to the 
20th of December, and from the 20th of January to 
the middle of June. For particulars, address the 
President, Rev. Thos. G. Apple, Mercersburg, Pa. 

NOTE. 

It is to be regretted that we are, as yet, unable to 
report any Female Seminaries under the care of the 
Church. Though Synod has taken action on the 
subject, and there are movements in this direction 
in several parts of the Church. This is a most press¬ 
ing need, and we hope next year to report something 
tangible on the subject. 


CLARION COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE, lo¬ 
cated at Rimersburg, Pa. 

Professor Rev. J. II. Apple , Principal. 

With a male and two female Assistants 


CATAWBA COLLEGE, Newton, North Caro¬ 
lina. 


MEE0IES IN DISUUISE. 

What is misfortune ? Whatever separates us from 
God. What is blessing? Everything that draws 
us closer to Him. The crosses and mortifications we 
meet with from others are a precious means of bum¬ 
bling and instructing us. It will cost,something to 
be a Christian; it will cost more not to be one. 


34 












ALMANAC FOR THE REFORMED CHURCH IN THE U. S. 
ALPHABETICAL REGISTER OP THE MINISTERS OF THE REFORMED CHURCH IN THE U. S, 


Accola, 0. J., Dayton, Ohio. 

Ackeret, J., Mt. Eaton, Wayne Co., Ohio. 

Addams, Geo. E., Turbotville, Northumberland Co., Pa. 
Albright, D. B.. Orwigsburg, Schuylkill Co., Pa. 
Albright, G. M., New Lisbon, Columbiana Co., Ohio. 
Aller, N. S., Prospectville, Montgomery Co., Pa. 
Alspach, J. W., New Salem, Fairfield Co., Ohio. 

Appel, Theodore, Prof., Lancaster, Pa. 

Apple, J. H. ( Prof., Rimersburg, Pa. 

Apple, T.G., Ph. D., Prof., Mercersburg, Franklin Co., Pa. 
Aughinbaugh, G. W., Reigelsville, Bucks Co., Pa. 

Ault. J., Mechanicsburg, Cumberland Co., Pa. 

Bachman, M., 185 Bank Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Bair, H., Millersburg, Elkhart Co., Ind. 

Banks, C., New Philadelphia, Tuscarawas Co., Ohio. 
Barkley, T. J., Greensburg, Pa. 

Bartholomew, A., Lehighton, Carbon Co., Pa. 

Bassler, H. S., Shimersville, Lehigh Co., Pa. 

Bauman, E., Polk City, Iowa. 

Bauman, F. C., Zwingli, Dubuque Co., Iowa. 
Baumgardner, J., Akron, Ohio. 

Bausman, B., Reading, Pa. 

Beam, S. C., Wakeshma, Kalamazoo Co., Mich. 

Beck, John, Easton, Pa. 

Becker, Charles, Fennersville, Monroe Co., Pa. 

Becker, Cyrus J., Catasauqua, Lehigh Co., Pa. 

Becker, Philip, Columbia City, Whitley Co., Indiana. 
Beinhauer, J. C., Bridesburg, Pa. 

Bennet, W. C., Boiling Springs, Cumberland Co., Pa. 
Bentz, H., Clarence, Erie, Co., N. Y. 

Bentz, John W., Carlisle, Pa. 

Bentzing, E., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Berentz, C., Grandview, Ohio. 

Betz, C., Lawrenceburg, Dearborn Co., Indiana. 

Biel field, Herman, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Biery, John, Wathena, Donanhan Co., Kansas. 

Bippus, J., Gabon, Crawford Co., Ohio. 

Blsetgen, J., Shebc^gan, Wis. 

Bokum, Herman, Jonesboro', Tenn. 

Bomberger, Dr. J. H. A., 498 N. Fourth St. Philad’a. 
Bossard, Dr. J., Sheboygan, Wisconsin. 

Bossier, David, York, Pa. 

Bragonier, D. G., Edenburgh, Ya, 

Brakefield, J., Evansport, Ohio. 

Brecht, J. J., Sauk City, Sauk Co., Wis. 

Brendle, D. F., Bethlehem, Pa. 

Bressler, N. E., Fiskerville, Dauphin Co., Pa. 

Brown, I. G., Mercersburg, Pa. 

Bucher, John C., Pottsville, Pa. 

Bucher, T. P., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Burkholder, Jacob, Huntington, Indiana. 

Busche, John F., 108 Rivingston St., N. Y. City, N. Y. 
Buser, J. H., Columbus City, Louisa Co., Iowa. 

Butler, Thornton, Salisbury, Rowan Co., N. C. 

Butt, A., Pulaski, Williams Co., Ohio. 

Callender, S. N., Greencastle, Franklin Co., Pa. 

Caspar, A. B., New Berlin, Union Co., Pa. 


Cast, Charles, Lebanon, Warren Co., Ohio. 

Cecil, J. W., Thomasville, Davidson Co., N. C. 

Clapp, J. C., Newton, N. C. 

Cludius, T., Rochester, N. Y. 

Clemens, John M., Littlestown, Adams Co., Pa. 
Colliflower, J. D., N. Pittsburg, Randolph Co., Ind. 
Colliflower, Wm. F., Jefferson, Frederick Co., Md. 
Comfort, H. I., Burkitts ville, Met. 

Cort, Cyrus, Fayetteville, Franklin Co., Pa. 

Cort, Lucian, Allentown, Pa. 

Cremer, W. C., Sunbury, Pa. 

Dahlman, Jacob, Sen., Glassboro’, N. J. 

Dahlman, Jacob, Jr., 413 N. 38th St., Phikd’a, Fa 
Dale, A., Slippery Rock, Mercer Co., Pa* 

Daniel, H., Defiance, Ohio. 

Davis, P. S., Chambersburg, Pa. . 

Davis, W. F. P., New Oxford, Adams Co., Pa. • 
Deatrich, W. R. H., Gettysburg, Pa. 

Deatrick, Wm. M., Charlesville, Bedford Co., Pa. 
Dechant, A. L., Frederick, Montgomery Co., Pa, 
Dechant, F, W., 1444 Camae'St., Philadelphia! F* 
Dechant, G. B., Fennersville, Monroe Co.,- Pa. 

Decker, J. P., Freeport, Illinois. 

Denny,-J. C., Monti cello, N. C. 

Denius, S. K., West Alexandria, Preble Co.) Ohio*. 

Derr, J. H., Wooster, Ohio. 

Derr, L. K., Mahanoy City, Schuvlkill Co., Pa. 
Dieffenbacher, C. R., Greenville, Mercer Co., Fa, 
Dieffenbacher, E. H., London, MeVcer Co., Pa. 

Diehl, D. P., Danville, Montour Co., Pa. 

Dole, A. G., 408 N. 35th St,, Philad’a. 

Douglas, R., Sharpsburg, Washington Co., Md. 

Dubs, A. J. G., Allentown, Pa. 

Dubs, J. H., Pottstown, Montgomery Co., Pa. 

Dubs, Dr. J. S., North White Hall, Lehigh Co., Pa. 
Duenger, R., Fountain Spring, Schuylkill Co., Pa. 
Ebbinghaus, John W., Washington, D. C. 

Eckert, J. V., Quarry ville, Lancaster Co., Pa. 
Edmonds, F. A., Foreston, Ogle Co., Illinois. 

Edmonds, L. C., Beaver Spring, Snyder Co., Pa 
Eichen J., Linton, Greene Co., Indiana. 

Ellicker, Sol., Waukou, Allamakee Co., Iowa. 

Engel, W. G., Shannondale, Clarion Co., Pa. 

Erb, Edmond, Danville, N. Y. 

Ermentrout, J. S., Reading, Pa. 

Ernst, D. B., Saegertown, Crawford Co., Pa. 

Eschbach, E. R., Baltimore, Md. 

Eschmeier, H., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Etter, T. J., New Glarus, Greene Co., Wis. 

Feete, Daniel, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Fehr, C. H., Giard, Clayton Co., Iowa. 

Fenneman, W. H., Lima, Allen Co., Ohio. 

Fisher, Charles G., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Fisher P. S., Sellersville, Bucks Co., Pa. 

Fisher, Dr. S. R., 54 North Sixth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Fogel, Edward, J., Fogelsville, Lehigh Co., Pa. 

Foulk, J. S., 130 Mulberrv Street. Baltimore, Md 

35 




ALMANAC FOR THE REFORMED CHURCH IN THE U. S, 


Fouse, D. S., Central City, Linn Co., Iowa. 

Fouse, Tb:, James Creek, Huntingdon Co., Pa. 

Fox, P., Ban Francisco, Califprnia. 

Frankel, M:, Holyoke, Mass. 

Pritchey, J. G., Lancaster, Pa. 

FVRzinger, J., Greenbrier, Northumberland Co., Pa. 
Gackenneimer, J. D. Leslie, Van Wert Co., Ohio. 
Gaekler, G., Walhonding, Coshocton Co., Ohio. 

Gans, Hr. Daniel, Norristown, Pa. 

Oantenbein, J., 992 N. 7th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Gast F. A., Lancaster, Pa. 

Gehr, N., 1230 N. Sixth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Gehring, J., Howard Grove, Wis. 

Gerhara, D. W., New Holland, Lancaster Co., Pa.' 
Gerhard, W. T., Lancaster Pa. 

Gerhart, Dr. E. V., Lancaster, Pa. 

Getzendanner, Harrison, Middlebrook, Augusta Co., Va. 
Giesy, S. H:, 2043 Wallace St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Gilds, N‘. E., Mechanicstown, Fred. Co., Md. 

Gilpin, William, Macon, Macon Co., Ill. 

Glessner, G. W., Frederick, Md. 

Good, J. H. Prof. Tiffin, Ohio. 

Good, B., Prof. Tiffin, Ohio. 

Good, W. A., Reading, Pa. 

Goodrich, William, Clearspring, Washington Co., Md. 
Goss, Sebastian, Wadsworth, Medina Co., Ohio. 

Graeff, I. E. Lancaster, Pa. 

Greding, P., Decatur, Adams Co., Indiana. 

Grether, J. M., Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio. 

Gring, D;, Shrewsbury, York Co., Pa. 

Gring, John, Fredericksburg, Lebanon Co., Pa. 

Gring, W. A., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Orob, Jean, Newtonburg, Manitowoc Co., Wis. 

Groh, W. H., Boalsburg, Centre Co., Pa. 

Grosshusch, T., Newtonburg, Manitowoc Co., Wis. 
Hacke, Dr. N. P., Greensburg, Westmorland Co., Pa 
Hackman, W. G., Burr Oak, St. Joseph’s Co., Mich. 
Hamm, J. W., Nimisilla, Summit Co., Ohio. 

Han bar t, H., La Crosse, Wis. 

Hannabery, J., Shanesville, Tuscarawas Co., Ohio. 
Harbaugh, Dr. H., Prof., Mercersburg, Franklin Co., Pa. 
Haas, W. A., Sunbury, Pa. 

Hassler, J., Shippensburg, Cumberland Co., Pa. 

Hauser, J., Conrad, 1S22 Fitzwater St., Philadelphia Pa. 
Headrick, M. L., Lexington, N. C. 

Heckerman, H., Bedford, Pa., 

Heffiey, J., Canal Winchester, Ohio. 

Heilman, Calvin U., St. Clairsville, Bedford Co., Pa. 
Heilman, U. H., Jonestown, Lebanon Co., Pa. 

Heisler, Daniel Y, Womelsdorf, Berks Co., Pa. 
Helffenstein, A., Jr., North Wales, Montg’y C., Pa. 
HelfFenstein, A., Sen’r, Shamokin, Northum’b Co., Pa. 
Helffenstein, S., North Wales, Montgomery Co., Pa. 
Helfrieb, W. A., Fogelsville, Lehigh Co., Pa. 

Heller, A. J., Sipesville, Somerset Co., Pa. 

Heller, J., Sidney, Shelby Co., Ohio. 

Helm, J. F., Kidder, Caldwell Co., Mo. 

Helming, H., Howard’s Grove, Sheboygan Co., Wis. 

36 


Henneman, J. C., Beaver, Pike Co., Ohio. 

Henning, G. W.. Canton, Stark Co., Ohio 
Hensell, J. C., Mt. Crawford, Va. 

Herbruck, P., Canton, Ohio. 

Herman, A. J., Maxatawny, Berks Co., Pa. 

Herman, A. L., Reading, ra. 

Herman, H. M., West Alexandria, Preble Co., Ohio. 
Herman, J. S., Kutztown, Berks Co., Pa. 

Herman, L. C., Gilbertsville, Montgomery Co., Pa. 
Herring, S. E., Nankin, Ashland Co., Ohio. 

Hertz, Daniel, Ephrata, Lancaster Co., Pa. 

Hess, H , Mansfield, Richland Co., Ohio. 

Hess, S-, Hellertown, Northampton Co., Pa. 

Hibschman, H. H., W., Trappe, Montgomery Co., Pa, 
Hiester, Eli. Graiitsville, Dauphin Co., Pa. 

Hiester, J. E., Annville, Lebanon Co., Pa. 

Iligbee, E. E., D.D., Prof. Mercersburg, Franklin Co., Pa 
Hines, Jesse, Akron, Summit Co., Ohio. 

Hoffheins, John A., Carlisle, Pa. 

Hoffman, H., Conyngham, Luzerne Co., Pa. 

Hoffman, P. P. A., Oley, Berks Co., Pa. 

Hoffmeier, C. F., Rebersburg, Centre Co., Pa. 

Hoffmeier, J. W., Manchester, Carroll Co., Md. 

Hofford, W. R., Allentown, Pa. 

Hottenste'in, A. R., Berwick, Columbia Co., Pa. 

Houpt, Wm. C., Lineville, Clarion Co., Pa. 

Iioyman, C. W., Somerset, Ohio. 

Hoyman, J., Orangeville, Stephenson Co., Ills. 

Huber, S. M. K., Kulpsville, Montgomery Co., Pa. 
Huellhorst, F Mann’s Landing, Manitowoc Co., Wis. 
Hursche, F., Black Creek, Holmes Co., Ohio. 

Ingle, J., China Grove, Rowan Co., N. C. 

Ingold, Jeremiah, Lincolntop, N. C. 

Jaeckel, Carl, Rochester, Beaver Co., Pa. 

James W. W., Charleston, Ill. 

Joerris, P., Poland, Clay Co., Indiana. 

Johnston, G. H., Greensburg, Westmorland Co., Pa. 
Johnston, Dr. T. S., Lebanon, Pa. 

Keener, H. F., Latrobe, Westmoreland Co., Pa. 
Kefauver, L. H., Tiffin, Ohio* 

Kehm, Jacob, Pillow, Dauphin Co., Pa. 

Keller, Eli, Bellevue, Huron Co., Ohio. 

Kelley, D. W., Bellefonte, Centre Co., Pa. 

Kemmerer, D., Wooster, Ohio. 

Kercher, J., Lacon, Illinois. 

Kershner, Jacob B., Mercersburg, Franklin Co., Pa. 
Kester, Joseph, Marion, Marion Co., Ohio. 

Kieffer, E., Carlisle, Pa. 

Kieffer, J. Spangler, Huntingdon, Pa. 

Kieffer, Dr. M., Prof., Tiffin, Ohio. 

King, H. Baltimore, Ohio. 

King, S. N., New Lisbon, Columbiana Co., Ohio. 

Kissel, J. G., Auburn, De Kalb, Co., Indiana. 

Klar, J. C., East Ringold, Pike Co., Ohio. 

Klein, D. G., Walker, Centre Co., Pa. 

Klein, J., Schuylkill Co., Pa. 

Klein, J. H., Fort Wayne, Indiana. 

Klingler, J., Upper Sandusky, Wyandotte Co., Ohio. 




ALMANAC FOR THE REFORMED CHURCH IN THE U. S. 


Klopp, D. E., 1614 N. 7th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Kluge, J. T., Sheboygan, Wisconsin. 

Knepper, B., Wellersourg, Somerset Co., Pa. 

Knepper, Chas., Steinsville, Lehigh Co., Pa. 

Knepper, Charles 0., Waterloo, Iowa. 

Knepper, H., Ogle Station, Lee Co!, Illinois. 

Knie, J., Ebenezer, New York. 

Kniest, J. B., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Knipe, Jesse B., Chester Springs, Chester Co., Pa. 
Koehler, R., Akron, Ohio. 

Koplin, A. B., Elk Lick, Somerset Co., Pa. 

Kortheuer, H., Massillon, Ohio. 

Krahn, Albert, Hazleton, Luzerne Co., Pa. 

Krebs, W. E., Waynesboro’, Franklin Co., Pa. 

Kremer, A. H., Lancaster, Pa. 

Kremer, A. R., Pattonville, Bedford Co., Pa. 

Kremer, F. W., Lebanon, Pa. 

Kretzing, John, Cochran ton, Crawford Co., Pa. 
Kroenlem, M., Rev., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Kroh, Daniel, Elkhart, Elkhart Co. Indiana. 

Kroh, P. H., Anna, Ill. 

Kuenzler, F., Chicago, Ill. 

Kuhl, P., Ai, Fulton Co., Ohio. 

Kuhlen, G., Yermilion, Erie, Co., Ohio. 

Kuhn, Samuel, Hummelstown, Dauphin Co., Pa. 
Kurtz, H., Dr., Waukesha, Wis. 

Kurtz, Julius, Tamaqua, Schuylkill Co., Pa. 

Kurtzman, G., Sparta, Monroe Co., Wise. 

Kulling, John, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Kuss, C. Monroeville, Erie Co., Ohio. 

Lake, Orange E., Shelbyville, Illinois. 

Landis, W. M., Harmony, Butler Co., Pa. 

Lang, J. E., New York, N. Y. 

Lantz, Daniel, Constantine, St. Joseph Co., Mich. 

Lantz, John, Newton, Catawba Co.,N. C. 

Leberman, D. D., Meadville, Crawford Co., Pa. 
Leberman, L. D., Reading, Pa. 

Lefever, J. M., Fairfield, Green Co., Ohio. 

Lefevre, Wm. D., Martinsburg, Berkley Co., W. Ya. 
Lehman, T. D., Akron, Summit Co., Ohio. 

Leibert, J., Galion, Crawford Co., Ohio. 

Leidv, George, Norristown, Montgomery Co., Pa. 
Leinbach, A. S., Reading, Pa. 

Leinbach, T. C., Womdsdorf, Berks Co., Pa. 

Leinbach, C. H., Stouchburg, Berks Co., Pa. 

Leinbach, S. A., Womelsdorf. Berks Co., Pa. 

Leis, J. A., Miamisburg, Ohio. 

Leiter, S. B., Navarre, Stark Co., Ohio. 

Leonard, G. H., Basil, Fairfield Co., Ohio. 

Lescher, J. W., Selinsgrove, Snyder Co., Pa. 

Leupp, A., Almond, Portage Co., Wis. 

Levan, F. K., Prof., Mt. Pleasant, Westm’d Co., Pa. 
Lienkamper, C., Lowell, Dodge Co., Wis. 

Limberg, C. A., Butler, Butler Co., Pa. 

Lisberger, Robert, Kreidersville, Northampton Co., Pa. 
Loeders, E. F., Lafayette, Indiana. 

Lohr, 0. T., New Brunswick, N. J. 

Long, George, Indianapolis, Ind. 


Long, P. A., Lexington, N. C. 

Long, T., Salem, N. C. 

Loos, I. K., Bethlehem, Northampton Co., Pa. 

Loose, J. S., Greencastle, Pa. 

Loose, N. H., Shelby, Ohio. 

Losch, Henry, Egg Harbor City, Atlantic Co., N. J. 
Love, J. W., Alexandria, Huntingdon Co., Pa. 

Lukens, Charles, Frankford, Philadelphia Co., Pa. 
Luscher, R., St. Joseph, Mo. 

Martin, George H., Woodstock, Shenandoah Co., W. Va. 
Martin, C. T., Terre Haute, Ind. 

Matzinger, I., Auburn, De Kalb Co., Indiana. 

May, Josiah, Finley, Hancock Co., Ohio. 

Mayer, Jacob, Lock Haven, Clinton Co., Pa. 

Mayer, L. J., New Hanover, Montgomery Co., Pa 
Mayer, P., Orwigsburg, Schuylkill Co., Pa. 

McCaughey, Wm., Greenville, Dark Co., Ohio. 

McCauley, C. F., Reading, Pa. . 

McConnell, J., Cory don, Indiana. 

Mease, Samuel, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Mechling, Geo. Z., Seven Mile, Butler Co., Ohio. 
Michael, J., Winnamac, Pulaski Co., Ohio. 

Michel, Christopher, Rahway, N. J. 

Mickley, J. M., Akron, Summit Co., Ohio. 

Miller, Abraham, Louisville, Stark Co., Ohio. 

Miller, E. D., Claypool, Kosciusco Co., Indiana. 

Miller, Henry, Schuylkill, Chester Co., Pa, 

Miller, J. 0., York, Pa. 

Miller, M., Sharon, Mercer Co., Pa. 

Miller, M. A., Lake, Stark Co., Ohio. 

Miller, Samuel, Pottsville, Pa. 

Miller, Simon S., Sunbury, Northumberland Co., Pa. 
Millet, J. K., Walker, Centre Co., Pa. 

Mohr, F. J., Millersburg, Dauphin Co., Pa. 

Moore, D. R., Loudonville, Ashland Co., Ohio. 

Mosser, Henry, Limestoneville, Montour Co., Pa. 
Miihlmeier, H. A. Howard’s Grove, Sheboygan Co., Wis. 
Naille, J., Petersburg, Mahoning Co., Ohio. 

Neuber, J. G., 1304 Howard St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Nevin, Dr. J. W., Lancaster, Pa, 

Nicks, H. R., Meyerstown, Lebanon Co., Pa. 

Noss, John G., Huntington, Indiana. 

Pence, John, Tremont, Clark Co., Ohio. 

Pennypacker, J. J., Rural Yillage, Armstrong Co., Pa. 
Peters, J. A., Prof., Mt. Pleasant, Westmore’d Co., Pa* 
Pfister, J. P., New York, N. Y. 

Philips, Samuel, Allentown, Pa. 

Pilgram, Frederick, Greenville, Mercer Co., Pa. 

Pister, Jacob, 40 North Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 
Pliiss, C., Crothersville, Jackson Co., Indiana. 

Poerner, J. B., Miners ville, Schuylkill Co., Pa. 

Porter, Dr. Thomas C., Easton, Pa. 

Praikschatis, L., Kiel, Manitowoc Co., Wis. 

Prugh, Peter C., Xenia, Green Co., Ohio. 

Raths, C., Hessville, Ohio. 

Rebaugh, John, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Reid, S. H., Milton, Pa. 

Reily, Wm. M., Lewisburg, Union Co., Pa. 


37 



ALMANAC FOR THE REFORMED CHURCH IN THE U. S. 


Reinecke, E. W., Nazareth) Pa. 

Reinhart, J., North Lima, Mahoning Go., Ohio. 

Reiter, C. B., Wadsworth, Ohio. 

Reiter, D. IL, Berrien Spring, Berrien Co., Mich. 

Reiter, I. H., Miamisburg, Ohio. 

Renter, W., Youngstown, Mahoning, Co., Ohio. 

Rettig, George, Fostoria, Seneca Co., Ohio. 

Rettig, John, Wheatland, Clinton Co., Iowa. 

Reutlinger, Sol., Auburn, Fon du Lac Co., Wis. 

Riale, J., Tipton, Iowa. 

Richards, J., Northampton, Ohio. 

Rickli, S. S., Columbus, Ohio. 

Riegel, Daniel, Dillsburg, York Co., Pa. 

Rike, Levi, Cotfydon, Indiana. 

Rinker, H., St. John, Edenburgh, Ya. 

Rittenhouse, C. A., Mifflinburg, Union Co., Pa. 

Romeis, John, Benton, Carver Co., Min. 

Romich, A., 2023 Girard Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Roser, Philip, North Vernon, Jennings Co., Ind. 

Rodrock, W. D. C., Blain, Perry Co., Pa. 

Rothrock, D., Bucksville, Bucks Co., Pa. 

Ruetenik, H. J., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Ruetnik, N., Loran, Stephenson Co., Ill. 

Ruhl, J., Defiance, Ohio. 

Ruhl, J. B., South West, Elkhart Co., Indiana. 

Ruhl, J. G., Finley, Hancock Co., Ohio. 

Rupley, F. A., Middletown, Frederick Co.,. Md. 

Rupp, Wm., Berlin, Somerset Co., Pa. 

Russell, C. C., Latrobe, Westmorland Co., Pa. 

Russell, Geo. B., Allegheny City, Pa. 

Rust, H., Prof., Tiffin, Ohio. 

Sandoe, W. B., Erie, Monroe Co., Mich. 

Santee, J. W., Cav^town, Washington Co., Md. 

Saure, C., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Schaad, Fred., Dundee, Tuscarawas Co., Ohio. 

Schaff, Charles, Kenton, Harden Co., Ohio. 

Sehaff, Dr. Philip, 5 Bible House, New York. 

Scheel, C;, Hagerstown, Md. 

Schiller, C., Limaville, Stark Co., Ohio. 

Schlappig. Joseph H., Mt. Pleasant Mills, Snyder Oo., Pa* 
Schlosser, J., Kewana, Fulton Co., Ohio. 

Schneck, Dr. B. S., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Schneider, Dr. B., A in tab, Syria. 

Schoepfle, Christian H., Waukou, Allemakee Go., Iowa. 
Schory, P. D., Lancaster, Ohio. 

Schroeder, A., Hackensack, N. J 
Schultz, C. W., Camden, N. J., ' 

Schultz, James A., Worcester, Montgomery Co., Pa. 
Schwartz, J., Loran, Stephenson Co. Ill. 

Schwarz, L. B., Boston Mass. 

Schwarz, P. A.. Greenfield,. Mass. 

Schwoedes, R. S., Covington, Ky. 

Scott, J., Piqua, Miami Co., Ohio. 

Sechler, Jacob, Hanover, York Co., Pa. 

Sechler, Jos., Lena, Stephenson Co., Ohio. 

Seibert, G., Ph. D., Newark, N. J. 

Seipel, Tilghman J., Marshallville, Wayne Co., Ohio. 
Shade, J. S., Adams, Armstrong Co., Pa. 

38 


Shafer, George, Nevins, Ohio. 

Shaw, Samuel, Mohicanville, Ashland Co., Ohio. 

Sheip, L. C., Bloomsburg, Columbia Co.,‘Pa. 
Shellhammer. I., Conyngham, Luzerne Co., Pa. 

Shenkle, A B., Trappe, Montgomery Co., Pa. 

Shepler, J. R., Navarre, Stark Co., Ohio. 

Shoemaker, D. 0., Jefferson Furnace, Clarion Co., Pa. 
Shoemaker, E. D., Irvin’s Station, Westmorland Go., Pa, 
Shoemaker, J. G., Curllsville, Clarion Co., Pa 
Shuford, M. L., Winchester, Va. 

Simon, J. J., Pittsfield, Mass. 

Skyles, N. H., Schellsburg, Bedford Co., Pa 
Smith, M. A., Nazareth, Northampton Co., Pa. 

Smith, R. R., York, Pa. 

Snyder, Jacob F-, Salem X Roads, Westmorland Co., Pa 
Snyder, W.. H. H., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Sorber, William, Vincent, Chester Co., Pa. 

Spangler, E., Edgarton, Williams Co., Ohio. 

Spangler, P. J., West Lebanon, Wayne Co., Ohio. 

Spies, Wm., New Bavaria, Defiance Co., Ohio: 

Staley, G. L., Jefferson, Frederick Co., Md. 

Stauffer, T. F., Apollo, Armstrong Co., Pa. 

Steckel, L. D., Miliersville; Lancaster Co., Pa-. 

Stein, J. P., Schuylkill Haven. Schuylkill Co., Pa: 
Steiner, J. r Taney town/Can*ol Co., Md. 

Steinmetz, John W., Danville, Montour Co.^Md. 

S^em, T. 0. 

Stepler, J. H., Sharon, Mercer Co., Pa. 

Stern, Max, Louisville, Ky. 

Stern, M. G. I., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Stiely, I., Rough and Ready, Schuylkill Go., Pa. 
Strassburger, N. S., Allentown, Pa. 

Strassner, F., Lancaster, Fairfield Co., Ohio. 

Stroes, H. M. K., Clymer, Chantauque Co., N. Y. 

Stuck, J., New Pittsburg, Randolph Co., Ind. 

Super. H. W., Kutztown, Berks Co., Pa. 

Swander, J. I., Northampton, Clark Co., Ohio. 

Sykes, H. John, Somerset, Pa. 

Tendick, P., Huron. Erie Co., Ohio. 

Thomas, R. C., Springfield, Ohio. 

Thompson, Joseph B., Fremont, Otiio. 

Titzel, J. M., Emmitsburg, Frederick Co., Md. 
Toensmeier, Aug., Toledo, Ohio. 

Transeau, S., Kutztown, Berks Ca, Pa. 

Trautman, H., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Vandersloot, F. W., York, Pa-. 

Vaughan, A. S., York, Pa. 

Vergenz, J. F., Auburn Clare,. Fon du Lac, Co., Wm. 
Vitz, P., Huntington, Huntington Co., Ind. 

Voegelin, John, 738 Baltimore St.,. Baltimore, Md. 

Vogt, J., Delaware, Ohio. 

Voigt, H. E. F., Mt. Pleasant, Westmorland Co. r Pa. , 
Von Puechelstein,, Dr. Anton, Egg Harbor City, N. J, 
Wagner, H., Lebanon, Pa. 

Wagner, J. H., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Wagner, S. G., Blue Bell, Montgomery Co., Pa, 

Wald, Paul, Troutville, Clearfield Co., Pa. 

Wall, F., Georgetown, Brown Co., Ohio. 





ALMANAC FOR THE REFORMED CHURCH IN THE U. S. 


Wanner, Aaron, Cumberland, Md. 

Wasnich, W., Pulaski, Williams Co., Ohio. 
Weaver, J., Sidney, Ohio. 

Weber, Geo., Elroy, Fulton Co,, Ill. 

Weiler, €., Gal ion," Ohio. 

Weiser, C. Z., Pennsburg, Montgomery Co., Pa. 
Weiser, Daniel, Pennsburg, Montgomery Co., Pa. 
Weisz, I. S., Stone Church, Northampton Co., Pa. 
Welker, Geo, W., Shaws Mills, Guilford Co., N. C. 
Whitmer, A. C., Martinsburg, Blair Co., Pa. 
Wiegand, H., White Pigeon, St. Joseph Co., Mich. 
Wiekle, J. G., 530 St. John St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Willers, D., Fayette, Seneca Co., N. Y. 

Williard, Dr. G. W, Tiffin, Ohio. 

Williard, H., Circleville, Pickaway Co., Ohio. 
Wilson, E. B., Forks, Columbia Co., Pa. 

Winter, H. A., Waukesha, Wisconsin. 

Winter, J.. Chatfield, Ohio. 

Winters, David, Dayton, Ohio. 

Winters, T. H., Carrollton, Ohio 
Wise, F., South Bend, Armstrong Co., Pa. 

Wissler, H., Shepherdstown, W. Va. 

Wittenwieler, W., Bucyrus, Crawford Co., Ohio. 
Witzgall, W., Napoleon, Ohio. 

Woeliler, E. T. H., Appleton, Wis. 

Wolff, Dr. B. C., Lancaster, Pa. 


Wolff, C. B., Chestertown, Kent Co., Md. 

Wolff, D. W., Arendtsville, Adams Co., Pa. 

Wolff, G., Meverstown, Lebanon Co., Pa. 

Wolff, G. D., Norristown, Pa. 

Wolff, J. G., Lancaster, Pa. 

Yearick, W. R., Hilltown, Bucks Co. Pa. 

Zacharias, Dr. D., Frederick, Md. 

Zacharias, G. R., Upper Strasburg, Franklin Co., Pa. 
Zahner, Dr. J. G., Rogersville, Tuscarawas Co., Ohio. 
Zehring, J. D., Codorus, York Co., Pa., 

Zeiser, Philip, Hamburg, Mercer Co., Pa. 

Zeller, Daniel, Allentown, Pa. 

Zellers, Jonathan, Lock Haven, Clinton, Co., Pa. 
Zieber, W. K., Hanover, York Co., Pa. 

Ziegler, A. F., Mertztown, Berks Co., Pa. 

Ziegler, D., York, Pa. 

Ziegler, G., Paris, Stark Co., Ohio. 

Ziegler, J., York, Pa. 

Zimmerman, C. D., Gabon, Ohio. 

Zimmerman, W. H., Frederick, Md. 

Zinck, Charles, Stone Creek, Tuscarawas Co., Ohio. 
Zuilch, J., Steinsville, Lehigh Co., Pa. 

Yumpe, G. H., Terre Haute, Vigo Co., Ind. 

Zumpe, J. B., Lafayette, Indiana 
Zwisler, Charles, Canfield, Ohio. 


DEATH OF MINISTERS FROM SEPTEMBER 1, 1866, TO SEPTEMBER 1, 1867. 


Names. 

Licensed. 

Ordained. 

Residence at Time of 
Death. 

Time of Death. 

Age. 

Rev. Sam’l Helffenstein, D. D. 

1796 

1797 

Near North Wales, Pa. 

October 18, 1866. 

92 

“ John Hoyman. 

1850 

1852 

Near Middletown, 0. 

August 16, 1867. 

56 

“ Robert Douglas. 

1833 

1834 

Near Sharpsburg, Md. 

August 20, 1867. 

60 


YOUR DANGER. 

What a solemn question the Apostle asks in He¬ 
brews, ii. 3! How shall we eseape, if we neglect so 
great salvation ? 

Your great work in this world, is to save your soul. 
By nature it is lost; Christ came to save it; you 
must accept His mercy, and use His means of grace. 
Are you doing this? 

Your work is your salvation. If you fail here, all 
is lost. If you lose your right hand, you still have 
the left; if you lose your eyes, your hearing remains; 
if you lose your property, you can get other posses¬ 
sions; but if you lose your soul, all is lost! 

Christ offers salvation in His Church, and through 
His sacraments; your great danger is, that you are 
not trying to save your lost soul. It is not in danger 
of being lost, it is already lost; but the danger is in 
its not \ eiDg saved. 


Are you making your salvation sure? When you 
are sick, you go to the physician; when hungry, you 
eat food. Oh, seeing that you are lost in sin, why do 
you not go to Christ for the great salvation which He 
offers you? 

Are you not neglecting it? Are you not waiting 
till you are older? Are you waiting for a more con¬ 
venient season, till you are better or more comforta¬ 
bly fixed in life? Are you waiting on a friend? 

Are you not afraid of being overtaken ? Oh, why 
do you so trifle with your danger ? 

Now look back over this matter. You are lost, 
and only in danger of not being saved; Christ offers 
you salvation in and through His Church, but you 
are neglecting that great salvation. 

How , then , shall you escape? Christ is your only 
hope. Where else can you look? To whom else 
can you go ? 39 
















THEE MERCERSBURGr REVIEW 


The “Mercersburg Review ” was commenced in January, 1849. In 1853 its name was changed to “Mercers- 
burg Quarterly.” In 1857 the old name was restored, and under that title it was issued up to the close of 1861, 
when its publication was suspended. 

Since its suspension a growing desire for its re-issue has been expressed from various directions. The earnest 
questions which it so vigorously discussed in former years, are neither fully settled nor out of the way, and new 
allied issues are pressing upon the Church from all sides. It is felt that the work of the Review is not yet done; 
and hence, resuming the old title, it is, at the same time, designed that this Review shall be, as far as possible, in 
character, life, and spirit, a continuation of the old Mercersburg Review. 

The design of the Review is the development of Christological, Historical, and Positive Theology; and to labor 
in the sphere of general science and literature only so far as these are necessarily related to, and must be moulded 
by the science of sciences. Its pattern is the venerable Apostles’ Creed. With the Creed the Review regards Jesus 
Christ as the Central Revealer of the Mystery of the Holy Trinity; the true and ultimate principle of all revelation ; 
the new Head and Life of Humanity restored in His Person, and to be glorified in Him by the Holy Ghost; the central 
principle of Christianity, and the fundamental basis of the Church, which is His Body. Hence, it holds all Theology 
to be primarily Christological; and, because Christological, also Historical; and, because both these, truly Positive. 

On the same ground, and for the same reason, the Review will be Catholic, claiming a title to the Theological 
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The Review appreciates at the same time the historical, theological, and practical necessity of the Reformation 
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Ivancement of theology during the last quarter of a century in Protestant Germany, the depth and wealth of which 
serves the honor and gratitude of entire Christendom, as having effected a decisive victory over the boldest and 
_ . ofoundest forms of unbelief. 

With these more general interests in view, the Review will not fail to give due attention to the more special 
department of Reformed Theology, both in its historical aspect, as reaching back to the Reformation, and in its pre¬ 
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especially to the German branch of the Reformed Church of this country. 

The Review will, moreover, steadily hold forth the fact, that the Theology by which the German branch of the 
Reformed Church of America, in its latest tendencies, is apprehended and carried forward, is not based on mere 
abstract speculation, but rather on the primal facts and the everlasting verities of Christianity; and it will aim at 
unfolding the deeply solemn practical character and tendencies of this type of theology. 

Finally, while this Review proposes to abate nothing of what is due to the scientific and classic form properly 
belonging to a Theological Review, it will endeavor, as far as possible, to meet and satisfy the needs of an intelligent, 
earnest, and inquiring laity. 

The Review is edited by the Rev. Henry Harbaugh, D.D., Professor in the Theological Seminary, Mercersburg, 
Pa,, assisted by other eminent writers of the Reformed and other Churches. It is published quarterly. Each num¬ 
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